Neuss

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Neuss

(nois), city (1994 pop. 148,560), North Rhine–Westphalia, W Germany. It is a rail junction and canal port, near the left bank of the Rhine opposite Düsseldorf. Its industries produce heavy and light machinery, chemicals, and food products; the city has an important grain market. Built on the site of a Roman camp called Novaesium, Neuss was chartered in the 12th cent. It belonged to the archbishopric of Cologne until the French Revolutionary Wars. In 1474–75, Charles the Bold of Burgundy, supporting the archbishop in a quarrel with the chapter of Neuss, unsuccessfully besieged the city for 11 months. It passed to Prussia in 1815. Noteworthy structures include the Romanesque Church of St. Quirinus (13th cent.), a city gate (13th cent.), and the city hall (17th–18th cent.).

Neuss

 

a city and port in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the Land of North Rhine-Westphalia; located opposite Düsseldorf on the left bank of the Rhine River, where the Erft River empties into the Rhine. Population, 117,000 (1972). Industries include nonferrous metallurgy, machine building (airplanes, motor vehicles, agricultural machinery, boilers, turbines), food processing (primarily vegetable oil), knitted clothing manufacture, and paper production.

Neuss

an industrial city in W Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia west of D?sseldorf: founded as a Roman fortress in the 1st century ad. Pop.: 152 050 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
1] The Sixteenth Legion, together with the auxiliary units which surrendered with it, received orders to move from Novaesium to Trier, a time-limit being fixed for their departure from camp.
Tacitus' historical filtering of the soldiers' departure from Novaesium at Histories 4.
Thus the capitulation of the legion at Novaesium forms a much closer match with the Caudine Forks surrender than the capitulation of the Vitellians after the battle of Bedriacum.