Novarupta


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Novarupta,

volcano, Alaska: see Katmai National Park and PreserveKatmai National Park and Preserve
, at the northern end of the Alaska Peninsula on Shelikof Strait, S Alaska, comprising Katmai National Park (3,674,530 acres/1,487,664 hectares) and an adjoining preserve (418,699 acres/169,514 hectares).
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References in periodicals archive ?
For 60 hours, Novarupta gushed out fiery dust and ash that spread over 12 miles.
Novarupta, one of several active volcanoes in the area, exploded for the greatest volcanic event of the twentieth century (and the second greatest of recorded history).
Indeed, following the Santa Maria eruption in 1902 and the Novarupta eruption of 1912, completely sunny days were nearly absent from the Blue Hill record for more than a year.
In 1912, the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century took place as Novarupta in Alaska began a series of explosive episodes over a 60-hour period.
Her mediations consider the constant lure of a gentler climate (she wishes she could be an Alaskan who lives in Hawaii); the abundance and lack of light on her two islands, Kodiak and Amook; devastating events such as the eruption of the Novarupta volcano in 1912 and the tsunami of 1964.
8 million at Katmai, home to peerless grizzly bear viewing and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, a geologic wonder linked to the 1912 eruption of Novarupta volcano and a key reason Katmai was designated a national park.
Novarupta, 841 m In June 1912, a new volcano--Novarupta Alaska (2,759 ft) --erupted violently on the flanks of high Katmai Volcano.
Una precedente del volcan Novarupta, en Alaska, ocurrida en 1912, arrojo mas material desde sus entranas, pero, dado el aislamiento de la region, no se registraron victimas y casi no hubo danos a propiedades.
The Novarupta eruption, ten times more powerful than Mount St.
The lay of the land was forever changed in 1912 when Mount Novarupta erupted, spewing pumice and rock that eventually covered 40 square miles in the Katmai area -- today called the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes -- at depths of up to 700 feet.
When Novarupta Volcano erupted in 1912 in Katmai National Park and Preserve, it created the "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes," where steam rose from countless fumaroles.
In June 1912, Mount Novarupta, across Shelikof Strait on the mainland, erupted, blanketing Kodiak with up to 18 inches of ash and forcing the temporary evacuation of hundreds of terrified residents.