Novorossiia

Novorossiia

 

a historical region in the southern Ukraine and partly in southern Russia, on the northern Black Sea.

Novorossiia became part of Russia in the 18th and early 19th centuries as a result of four peace treaties with Turkey (1739, 1774, 1791, 1812). The name “Novorossiia,” which means “New Russia,” is explained not so much by the territory’s late unification with Russia as by the relatively slow economic mastery of the sparsely populated new region. Novorossiia was settled primarily by Ukrainians and Russians. Land cultivation and livestock raising were the principal occupations. In the 18th century the cities of Ekaterinoslav, Nikolaev, Kherson, and Odessa arose in Novorossiia. By the late 19th and early 20th centuries, developed capitalist relations in agriculture and industry existed in Novorossiia. After the October Revolution of 1917 the name “Novorossiia” fell into disuse.

References in periodicals archive ?
While returning from active duty Zagriazhskii encountered at Kremenchug Aleksandra Iazykova, the very pregnant wife of a Moscow friend and newly appointed governor of Novorossiia Nikolai Danilovich Iazykov.
He was attracted by the free land that the Imperial Russian government was distributing in Novorossiia (New Russia), the region bordering the northwestern coast of the Black Sea, to attract settlement, as well as the commercial opportunities of the city itself.
Bartolomeo, the sole surviving owner at that point, concentrated on the industrial and banking side of the family business, which at that time comprised the Anatra Flour Mill, the Odessa Discount Bank, a share in Bessarabian-Tauride Bank, and significant real estate holdings in Odessa and other cities in Novorossiia.