Novorossiysk

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Novorossiysk

or

Novorossiisk

(both: nô'vərəsēsk`), city (1989 pop. 186,000), Krasnodar Territory, SE European Russia, on the Black Sea. A major port and a naval base, it exports grain and oil, has shipyards, and is a major center of the Russian cement industry. It is connected the pipelines to the oilfields of Kazakhstan. The city stands on the site of a Genoese colony (13th–14th cent.) and of a Turkish fortress, captured by the Russians in 1808. The present city was founded in 1838, and the first cement factory was opened in 1882. Before 1914 it was one of the important grain-exporting cities of Russia. The city was held (1919–20) by the White forces during the Russian civil war.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its journey was part of a significant uptick in merchant shipping heading for Syria from Russia; it was one of six ships that made their way from Novorossisk to Syria within two weeks in mid-September.
Pipelines that once passed through Chechnya from Baku on the Caspian to Novorossisk on the Black Sea have been moved to the north to safeguard supplies.
The Soviets pumped oil from Baku on the western shore across Russia to the port of Novorossisk on the Black Sea, which forces shipping to pass through the narrow Bosphorous strait near Istanbul, Turkey.
Novorossisk is already the largest oil port in Russia, but the CPC will not use Novorossisk's existing modern terminal because it is controlled by TransOil, a competing Russian company.
This created two geographic axes: one stretching from Murmansk to Reval; the other from Budapest to Novorossisk.
The ports are Novorossisk in Russia, Ceyhan in Turkey and Suspa in Georgia.
During February, Novorossisk was closed for the acceptance of rail cars for two weeks.
The 948-mile pipeline will deliver its first oil from the Tengiz oil fields to the Russian port of Novorossisk in mid-2001.
The first, favoured by Russia, is for shipment north, either via Georgia to the port of Supsa, or directly to Novorossisk, now Moscow's principal port on the Black Sea.
CRC-Evans has sold two of its largest pipe-bending machines to a consortium of companies developing an oil terminal and tank farm near the Russian port of Novorossisk on the Black Sea.