Nowy Sacz

Nowy Sącz

(nô`vĭ sôNch`), Ger. Neu-Sandez, city (1993 est. pop. 79,700), Małopolskie prov., SE Poland, on the Dunajec. It is a railway junction and an administrative and economic center. There are deposits of lignite and petroleum in the vicinity. Chartered in 1298, it passed to Austria in 1772 and was included in Poland in 1919. The city has several old churches; its 14th-century palace was destroyed in World War II.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nowy Sącz

 

a city in southern Poland and the administrative center of Nowy Sącz. Situated on the Dunajec River, in the Carpathians. Population, 43,000 (1972). Railroad junction. The chief industries are the repair of railroad locomotives and cars, the manufacture of electrodes, and food processing. Nowy Sącz was founded in the 13th century.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Former wonder kid to join newly promoted club Sandecja Nowy Sacz on trial, having played for 13 sides in eight different countries
The Polish officers, from Nowy Sacz, in the south of the country, are Olek Kubiak, Jan Zengel, Stanislaw Garula, Ireneusz Muchniewicz, Marcin Poreba and Artur Zerkowski.
Scores of members of the Tynemouth Mill Club will be donning their driving shoes and travelling from the North East to Poland to take part in the International Mini Meet at Nowy Sacz in June.