fuel reprocessing

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fuel reprocessing

[′fyül rē′präs‚es·iŋ]
(nucleonics)
The processing of nuclear reactor fuel to recover the unused fissionable material.
References in periodicals archive ?
spent fuel input tanks at a nuclear reprocessing plant`s blister sampling stations.
This reaction plays an important part in the creation of nuclear fuel through nuclear reprocessing and uranium enrichment.
John Eldridge has joined Cammell Laird from Sellafield which operates the nuclear reprocessing plant in West Cumbria.
THE Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria was given the all-clear yesterday after an investigation into higher-than-normal radiation readings detected at a perimeter fence.
THE Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria has been given the all-clear after an investigation into higher-than-normal radiation readings detected at a perimeter fence.
THE cost of decommissioning Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant has hit PS67.
He said The USA had opposed the nuclear programme of Pakistan, even pressurizing France to cancel the nuclear reprocessing plant which Paris had pledged in writing to sell to us.
It also aims to abolish the country's prototype fast-breeder reactor Monju and nuclear reprocessing programs, and to seek an alternative energy supply.
The 27-year-old now works at the nuclear reprocessing site Sellafield in Cumbria and says she owes it all to the staff at Henley College.
EAKS: The Dounreay nuclear reprocessing plant in Scotland where work has being going on this week to clear-up the latest 'minor' leak at the site, which is being decommissioned
Russian agent Alexei finds Kato's murder summons a dark set of memories-and his decision to avenge her death leads him on an investigation from Moscow to the site of a nuclear reprocessing plant and to Las Vegas, even as his personal life collapses.
Bush pushed a plan, the Global Nuclear Energy Project (GNEP), to promote the use of nuclear power and subsidize the development of a new generation of "proliferation-resistant" nuclear reprocessing technologies that could be rolled out to the commercial nuclear energy sector.

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