nucleophile

(redirected from Nucleophiles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

nucleophile

[′nü·klē·ə‚fīl]
(physical chemistry)
A species possessing one or more electron-rich sites, such as an unshared pair of electrons, the negative end of a polar bond, or pi electrons. Also known as electron donor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, different reaction conditions are needed for different aziridines and epoxides with nucleophiles because of their different reactivity and the structural complexity of the aziridines and epoxides [8, 9].
The dechlorination in the absence of SCN was negligible, proving that a nucleophile is essential for the dechlorination under these conditions.
Very recently, the group of Fletcher reported that alkylzirconium reagents can be employed as non-stabilized nucleophiles in combination with a copper-based catalytic system for this class of processes.
Hydroperoxides are very good nucleophiles because of the alpha effect, whereby interaction of lone electron pairs on two adjacent oxygen atoms increases nucleophilicity [78], and this explains the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide with aldehydes.
The polymerization occurs through a nucleophilic substitution reaction of DCDPS as difunctional nucleophiles with bisphenol A in dimethyl sulfoxide, DCDPS forms a material called Udel.
Other topics are molecular structure and reactivity, general principles for writing reaction mechanisms, reactions of nucleophiles and bases, reactions involving acids and other electrophiles, radicals and radical ions, and pericyclic reactions.
Synthesis of Pyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidine Derivative and Its Behaviour towards Nitrogen Nucleophiles and Active Methylenes, Journal of the Chinese Chemical Society, 50: 887-891.
The alkylation of nucleophiles (such as thiol-containing cystein residues in proteins, free intracellular GSH and DNA) by the electrophilic moieties of the STLs is the most common mechanism leading to macromolecular dysfunction (Amorim et al.
Recent advances in nucleopallada-tion have resulted in the preparation of Wacker-type products via C-H activation with a variety of nucleophiles leveraging catalysis by palladium II salts.
Substitution of fluorine with various chromophores can be done by using aryl nucleophiles or ethynyl nucleophiles (Scheme 1) to create a large, virtual Stokes shift, anywhere in the range of 8,000 [cm.
This melanin cytotoxicity is attributed, in part, to its ability to bind covalently to cell-membrane components and other cellular nucleophiles.