Numa Pompilius


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Numa Pompilius

(no͞o`mə pŏmpĭl`ēəs), legendary king of Rome, successor to Romulus. His consort, the nymph Egeria, was said to have aided him in his rule. The origin of Roman ceremonial law and religious rites was ascribed to him. Among other achievements, he was supposedly responsible for the pontifices, flamens (sacred priests), vestal virgins, worship of Terminus (the god of landmarks), the building of the temple of Janus, and the reorganization of the calendar into days for business and holidays.

Numa Pompilius

 

according to ancient tradition, the second king of ancient Rome (reigned from 715 to 673 or 672 B.C.).

Numa was a Sabine. He is regarded as the founder of various religious cults, as well as the organizer of the priestly colleges and the artisans’ colleges.

REFERENCE

Nemirovskii, A. I. Ideologiia i kul’tura rannego Rima. Voronezh, 1964. [18–433–l]

Numa Pompilius

the legendary second king of Rome (?715--?673 bc), said to have instituted religious rites
References in periodicals archive ?
His successor Numa Pompilius tried to solve the problem by creating January and February and adding a new month of Mercedinus to fall every other year.
A sampling of essay topics: credibility and credulity in Plutarch's Life of Numa Pompilius, divine sons--Aeneas and Jesus in Hebrews, notes on divesting and vesting in The Hymn of the Pearl, and Ante-Nicene preaching in recent literature.
And the forest of Nemi, where Numa Pompilius went to seek counsel from the nymph Egeria so that he could write his decrees.
Bankes's description of the prime picture as the Foundation of Rome prompts an identification of the protagonist as the quasi-divine king of Rome, Numa Pompilius, who succeeded Romulus on his death, and who purportedly established a pre-Augustan Golden Age.
In others, such as the odd couple of Lillian Gish and Paul Cadmus as the nymph Egeria and the Roman king Numa Pompilius, the obscurity of the reference adds to the mystery of the image, leaving the viewer to come up with his own interpretation.
90) This contrast, to take just one example, structures Plutarch's paired lives of the Spartan Lycurgus and the Roman Numa Pompilius, the latter of which, significantly, narrates the same model of the civilizing process that structures the Irish tracts.
He wrote that the Roman king Numa Pompilius strove "to inculcate fear of the gods as the most powerful influence that could act upon .
But we know from the writings of other humanists who dealt with this same theme that ancient rulers such as Moses, Aaron, and the Roman king Numa Pompilius often were cited in this context.