Numantia


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Numantia

(no͞omăn`shə), ancient settlement, Spain, near the Durius (now Douro) River and north of modern Soria. Numantia played a central role in the Celt-Iberian resistance to Roman conquest. Its inhabitants withstood repeated Roman attacks from the time of Cato the Elder's campaign (195 B.C.) until Scipio Aemilianus finally took the city in 133 B.C., after an eight-month blockade, thus completing the conquest of Spain. Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of Roman camps and evidence of settlement dating back to the Bronze Age.

Numantia

 

an ancient Iberian fortified settlement on the Duero (Duoro) River in Spain. Numantia arose on the site of the more ancient settlement of the Celtic Arevaci tribe. During the Numantian War of 143–133 B.C., it was the center of the local tribes’ heroic struggle against the Romans. Excavations conducted at the site of Numantia in the second half of the 19th century and from 1905 to 1923 revealed traces of life from the time of the early Bronze Age. During the sixth and fifth centuries B.C., the Celtiberian settlement was surrounded by a large stone wall. Numantia of the Roman period, built during the reign of Emperor Augustus, was no larger than the settlement that had preceded it. Excavations yielded the remains of Roman siege machinery and equipment and of Roman camps. A wealth of everyday objects has been collected; the local decorated pottery is especially interesting.

REFERENCE

Tsvetaeva, G. “Obzor materialov o raskopkakh Numantsii.” Vestnik drevnei istorii, 1946, no. 2.

Numantia

an ancient city in N Spain: a centre of Celtic resistance to Rome in N Spain: captured by Scipio the Younger in 133 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
Pedro el Viejo de Arlanza (Hortiguela, Burgos)", Numantia, 5 (1991-92), pp.
And however elevated was Cicero's discussion of just war theory in his treatise On Duties, or Obligations, with its advocacy of merciful treatment of conquered enemies, he was ruthless in his application of these principles, when, for instance, he defended the total destruction of Carthage and Corinth, which had taken place in 146 B.C., and of Numantia in Spain in 133 B.C., on the grounds of the "cruel monstrosities" these nations had committed against Rome.
pl.) 'the people of Numantia, in northern Spain' (1387), Tartarin 'made of a costly fabric, perhaps a kind of silk, from (or originally from, or imported via) Tartary' (1400), Tarentine 'from or pertaining to Tarentum, Tarentine' (1440), Sclavin(e) 'an inhabitant of some Slavic territory' (1450), Alpine 'Alpine' (1475) and Molmutine 'of Dunwallo Molmutius, British king and law-giver' (1475).
Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (Africanus Minor), el destructor de Cartago, en 147, y de Numantia, Hispania, en 133; de ahi el otro sobrenombre, el de Numantinus.
Fronto reminds him that the gods do on occasion give the Romans a hard time, listing as examples of such defeat: Allia, Caudium, Cannae, Numantia and Cirta (referring to the defeat of Albinus in 109 BC, during the Jugurthine war).
The army and the Roman Republic: the second century BC, Polybius and the camps at Numantia, Spain.
The army of the Roman republic; the second century BC, Polybius and the camps at Numantia, Spain.
The article considers Alberti's rereading and pruning of the Cervantine text, and the work of the actress-directors, Alberti's wife Maria Teresa Leon in 1937 for an audience of soldiers, and Margarita Xirgu in Montevideo in 1943, for an audience that might view Numantia's collective suicide very differently.
Upon returning from a glorious military victory at Numantia, Scipio Aemilianus was asked by one of Tiberius Gracchus's supporters what he thought about his kinsman's death, and enraged both his addressee and the Roman assembly by saying that Gracchus had rightly been slain.
(21) </pre> <p>In Richard Ellmann's translation:</p> <pre> Today as in the time of Pliny and Columella the hyacinth disports in Wales, the periwinkle in Illyria, the daisy on the ruins in Numantia and while around them the cities have changed masters and names, while some have ceased to exist, while the civilizations have collided with each other and smashed, their peaceful generations have passed through the ages and have come up to us, fresh and laughing as on the days of battles.