Nunavut Day

Nunavut Day

July 9
In relation to Canada's other provincial holidays, Nunavut Day is a new observance because the territory of Nunavut is itself new. Canada's northernmost territory was established on July 9, 1993, through a land claim signed by the national government and the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area. Territory leaders first designated Nunavut Day on April 1, but in 1999 they settled on the present date to commemorate the historic land agreement, which conferred self-governing powers to the territory.
Most of the day's activities take place in Nunavut's hub and capital city, Iqaluit. Festivities include barbeques, parades, traditional Inuit games, and feasts featuring local cuisine of caribou, walrus, and arctic char. In recent years, the day's program has also included organized tournaments of cribbage, checkers, and Scrabble.
CONTACTS:
Government of Nunavut
Directorate
P.O. Box 1000
Station 700
Iqualuit, NU X0A 0H0 Canada
www.gov.nu.ca
References in periodicals archive ?
McElroy describes a Nunavut Day celebration, which includes Inuit country music and visits from astronauts, as a way to frame the premise of her ethnography.
On July 9, 2010, member of the Advisory Council and Senior Judge of the Nunavut Court of Justice, Robert Kilpatrick, unveiled the winning design at a ceremony held during Nunavut Day festivities at the Legislative Assembly.
ARRIVING BACK IN CAMBRIDGE BAY with the caped and quartered bull, we learned that the Nunavut Day celebration was taking place that night at the community center.
However, Bill 11, An Act to Establish Nunavut Day as a Holiday, remains before the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Services, as it conducts consultations on the initiative.