Nunc dimittis


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Nunc dimittis

(nŭngk dĭmĭt`ĭs) [Lat.,=now you are dismissing], the opening words of Simeon's song of praise on the occasion of the presentation of the infant Jesus in the Temple. After seeing Jesus, Simeon joyfully proclaims that he has seen God's salvation. The hymn is used traditionally in evening liturgical services.

Nunc Dimittis

1. the Latin name for the Canticle of Simeon (Luke 2:29--32)
2. a musical setting of this
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They have been for me, in the words of the Nunc Dimittis, a "light of revelation" in a sometimes crazy world.
On Tuesday, the choir will be singing the Nunc Dimittis in G by Herbert Sumsion; Lift up your heads O Ye Gates - William Matthias; When to the Temple Mary Went - Johann Eccard and Ave Verum Corpus - Edward Elgar.
30pm the Newcastle Bach Choir will be conducted by Eric Cross in Durufle's Requiem, Britten s Festival Te Deum and MacMillan's Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis.
Once again, the rhythmic tunefulness is quick to appeal and the programme includes his Missa Brevis, Festival Te Deum and Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis.
But] congregations fizzle out on [his] "Let the Vineyards" and other pieces [and his] Nunc Dimittis is hardly ever used because it again strains congregations with difficulty.
Nunc dimittis servum tuum Domine empieza diciendo aquella hermosa oracion que podemos leer en Lucas 11-19, dicha por Simeon, el anciano sacerdote judio al circuncidar a Jesus.
A likely example of English service music is the Nunc Dimittis of Byrd's Great Service" (148).
Duddell's festival-commissioned Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis sounded more reflective than celebratory (hardly the joyous, uplifting experience claimed in the programme note), and the gutsy passion of Tippett's A Child of our Time Spirituals emerged only spasmodically.
They will be performing music old and new -including Howells famous Collegium Regale setting of the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis written for Kings College Cambridge and Rejoice in the Lord Always by the popular York-based composer Andrew Carter.
On a recent Sunday he more than held his own through a vigorous programme which included the Magnificat, the Nunc Dimittis, Glory Fills the Skies, Lord Enthroned in Heavenly Splendour, Soldiers of Christ Arise.
We still have the words of old Simeon in our worship in the words of the Nunc Dimittis.
The host of available settings of the songs of the Daily Office, such as the Magnificat and the Nunc dimittis, are testimony to the power of these texts.