Nutlet


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nutlet

 

(also nucule), a single-seeded, indehiscent fruitlet of an apocarpous fruit (for example, in the buttercup). Sometimes other small single-seeded fruits (the paracarpous fruits of fumitory; the lysicarpous fruits of buckwheat), the fruits of Boraginaceae and Labiatae, and the mericarps of Euphorbiaceae are called nutlets.

The Russian term for nutlet, oreshek, is used to designate a nutgall, a spherical or fleshy node caused by insects on the leaves and stems of plants (for example, nutgall of oak).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Micromorphological studies on nutlet and leaf indumentum of genus Teucrium L.
nux, where it was once included until size variation within West African populations prompted Robbins (1983) to separate the "nutlet" from the "nut".
FRUIT: 1" strobile with winged nutlets; NOT ORNAMENTAL.
The evolution of single-seededness was likely accompanied by increases in some other component(s) of seed yield such as flower (fruit) number or nutlet size.
Flowers contain four uniovulate mericarps; hence, each flower can produce 0-4 single-seeded nutlets. The corolla of bluebell flowers has a tubular base and a broad bell-shaped limb [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
FRUIT: 1/4" to 1/3" ovoid nutlet; slightly 5-angled and pointed.
Establishment of Lithospermum caroliniensis on sand dunes: the role of nutlet mass.
In Ficinia, the hypogynous stalk forms lobes enveloping the base of the gynoecium/ nutlet (cupule) (Vrijdaghs et al., 2005b).
Nutlet A small nut resembling an achene, but usually having a harder covering.
The gynophore in Cypereae, formed by the development of the hypogynous stalk, is characterised by a lobed cup that envelops the basal part of the nutlet (Vrijdaghs et al., 2005).