biogeochemical cycle

(redirected from Nutrient cycle)
Also found in: Medical.

biogeochemical cycle

[‚bī·ō‚jē·ō′kem·ə·kəl ′sīkəl]
(geochemistry)
The chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Greater adoption of sustainable agricultural methods can help -- including enhanced nutrient use efficiency, phased out fertilizer subsidies, no-till or reduced tillage and other conservation measures, and closing the nutrient cycle.
Water is the main ingredient for carbon accumulation in ecosystems, which stimulate biological processes and the nutrient cycle [8].
Since we can't create more phosphorus, we have to close the nutrient cycle within agricultural enterprises and beyond.
Some of this cut timber I leave in situ to rot down naturally, providing a home for woodland insects and microorganisms as part of the natural nutrient cycle.
Beyond this, the growing international food trade can separate producer and consumer by thousands of kilometres, further disrupting the nutrient cycle.
Their disappearance would break the nutrient cycle and have knockon effects on water quality, animal populations and human communities.
Rod Cunningham, RSPB head of water policy, said: "Using the nutrient cycle wisely is vital for agriculture, industry and the environment.
Instead of importing chickens from industrial agriculture operations, which are fed on imported corn meal and generate overwhelming mountains of chicken waste, many of the Hoje Taastrup residents use food scraps to feed the hens, then use the manure as fertilizer for their gardens--thus helping to close the nutrient cycle by preventing usable food waste from entering landfills and manure from entering the rivers.
Waste Composting for Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Closing the Rural--Urban Nutrient Cycle in Sub-Saharan Africa Pay Drechsel, Dagmar Kunze, eds.
Alliance Environmental is a recognized expert in the area of distributed green infrastructure and provides services to municipalities and private developments that seek to reduce the costs and environmental impacts of new and existing systems by optimizing water, carbon and nutrient cycle performance.
Planting trees provides flood control by minimizing runoff and the loss of top soil, provides habitat and nutrition for wildlife and nurseries for local fish populations, and offers alternative economic livelihoods for local communities in the form of managing tree nurseries and planting, assisting with regulation of the water and nutrient cycle.
That is a really powerful teaching tool," says Saxenian; "It turns the out-of-sight out-of-mind mentality around," and stimulates discussion of the nutrient cycle.