Nyctalus


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nyctalus

 

a genus of mammals of the family of common bats (Vespertilionidae). There are six species, inhabiting leaf-bearing forests of Eurasia (in the south, including the Malay Peninsula). They live in colonies in the hollows of trees and fly out to feed soon after sunrise, feeding mainly on beetles (the cockchafer and others). The females usually give birth to two young. There are three species found in the USSR—the hairy-armed bat or lesser noctule (N. leisleri), in the central and southern part of the European USSR and in the Caucasus; the giant noctule (N. lasiopterus), in the central and southern regions of the European USSR and in the northeastern Caucasus; and the common noctule (N. noctula), which lives in the European USSR, the Caucasus, the Tien-Shan, and east to the Altai.

REFERENCES

Kuziakin, A. P. Letuchie myshi. Moscow, 1950.
Mlekopitaiushchie fauny SSSR, part 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1963.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic divergence and phylogeography in the genus Nyctalus (Mammalia, Chiroptera): Implications for population history of the insular bat Nyctalus azoreum.
Future studies should consider specifically focusing on Nyctalus, Pipistrellus, and Myotis bat species, from which we most frequently detected variants similar to B.
Flight performance, echolocation and foraging behaviour in noctule bats Nyctalus noctula.
Although this research study is the second to demonstrate the bat's presence in the Iberian Peninsula, it offers the first description in the fossil record of the teeth of Nyctalus lasiopterus from a fragment of the left jaw.
Roost selection by noctules (Nyctalus noctula) and Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii).
Analysis of the diet of Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) in Ireland with some comparative analyses from England and Germany.
In 2000, two researchers in Italy reported that droppings from the giant noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) contained bits of bird feathers.
None of the specimens of Rhinolophus ferrumequini, Rhinolophus hipposideros, Nyctalus noctula, Vespertilio murinus and Plecotus auritus examined by Vitali (1924) were reported to have a paratympanic organ.
nivalis), the roe deer (Capreolus), the deer (Cervus elaphus), the moose (Antes antes), the boar (Sus scrofa), the badger (Meles meles), the otter (Lutra lutra), the squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris), the mountain hare or snow hare (Lepus timidus), the Balkan dormouse (Dryomys nitedula), the fat dormouse (Glis glis), the mole (Microtus oeconomus), shrews (Sorex minutissimus and Sorex caecutiens), 13 species of bats including some noctules (Nyctalus), the yellow-throated field mouse (Apodemus flavicollis), the red mole (Clethrionomys glareolus), the northern birch mouse (Sicista betulina), and the tanuki (Nyctereutes procyonoides), the latter an introduced species.
For comparison, metabolic data were obtained from Nyctalus noctula, a typically hibernating vespertilionid bat of s imilar body size and convergent foraging tactics.