Nyquist sampling

Nyquist sampling

[′nī‚kwist ‚sam·pliŋ]
(communications)
The periodic sampling of audio or video signals, in order to preserve their information content, at a rate equal to twice the highest frequency to be preserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The PicoScope 9404-05 has a built-in full-bandwidth trigger for each channel, with pre-trigger ETS (equivalent-time sampling) capture available to well above the Nyquist sampling rate.
For instance, it is restricted by the Nyquist sampling limit, the receiver needs a high sampling rate for the wideband waveform, which causes to the large resource consumption for data storage and processing.
The principal ingredients are the differential X-ray scattering cross sections of the elements and the Nyquist sampling theorem.
However, a large amount of data will be produced when monitoring the composite structure real-time and online by the use of ultrasonic phased array technology with Nyquist sampling theorem, which not only needs complicated processing of the data but also needs higher requirements for the acquisition system to complete the data collection.
In order to capture all the information from the continuous signal, it is necessary to fulfill the Nyquist sampling theorem [21].
The core of traditional image coding (e.g., JPEG) is the image transformation based on Nyquist sampling theorem.
Thus the following Nyquist sampling constraint should be met in order to avoid aliasing along the slant range direction:
In recent years, a new theory named compressive sensing (CS) [1] has surpassed the limits of the Nyquist sampling rate.
We define the time interval of the Nyquist sampling frequency as T.
(3.) Expanded Nyquist Sampling Theory, Newtons4th, Application Note 31, January 2015.
Nyquist sampling theorem is widely accepted as a means of representing band-limited signals by their digital samples.
Traditional approaches to acquiring and sampling signal are based on Nyquist sampling theory, which states that the sampling rate must be at least twice the maximum frequency of the input signal.