O Salutaris Hostia

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O Salutaris Hostia

(săl'yo͞otâr`ĭs, sä'lo͞otä`rĭs) [Lat.,=O saving victim], hymn to the Host, one of the two hymns regularly sung at the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in the Roman Catholic Church. The other hymn is Tantum ergo. O Salutaris is really the last two stanzas of a Corpus Christi hymn, Verbum supernum prodiens, probably written by St. Thomas Aquinas.
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't know if you can level up in Catholicism, but I just sang O Salutaris Hostia in Latin as a lullaby to my 2-year-old.
Such elements were reflected in Thomas Jennefelt's O Salutaris Hostia, with its wild rustic dance flavour.
It is the people's love for Jesus my Lord my God, O Salutaris, Mass of the Angels, Lead Kindly Light, Daily daily sing to Mary, O God of loveliness, and many more old Catholic favourites.
I remember our pastor walking the host slowly around the church, blessing the congregation, while my classmates and I sang O Salutaris Hostia, dutifully stumbling through the intricate Latin.
The inclusion of O Salutaris Hostia and O Sapientiae by the modern Swedish composer Jennefelt, though seemingly out of context, added a frisson of daring and a touch of spice to an impressive concert performance.
Thomas authored the hymns O Salutaris Hostia, Tantum Ergo and Adoro Te Devote.
At first a small streak of smoke would appear rising up between the trio, then a huge cloud as all knelt and the priest incensed the Blessed Sacrament while the congregation sang O Salutaris Hostia.
Making an impact on this occasion was Thomas Jennefelt's vibrant O Salutaris Hostia, its insistent rhythm and vibrant dissonances exc iting the ear, and the rich harmony of the final movement of Schoenberg's motet Fiede auf Erde, soaring to magnificent heights.