O level

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O level

formerly, in Britain
1. 
a. the basic level of the General Certificate of Education, now replaced by GCSE
b. (as modifier): O level maths
2. a pass in a particular subject at O level
References in periodicals archive ?
His father, Rai Manzoor Nasir claimed that the normal age for passing the O-Level exam is 17 to 18 years, which means that 14 years of schooling is normally needed to pass the exam.
The publications do not cover checking for the CO2 cartridges during O-Level maintenance.
The paper, set two weeks ago, used numerical parts of both O-Level and GCSE exam papers from the past five decades.
Using this philosophy, a failure at the O-level should also fail at both the I-level and depot level of maintenance.
This also means my greatest achievement in life is my C grade in O-level mathematics.
1984: The biggest exam shake-up for over 10 years is announced with O-Level and CSE exams to be replaced by a new GCSE.
He said: "I was in art school and had long hair and velvet jackets and I quite enjoyed art, sculpture and all that stu, and I ended up doing an O-level in sculpture and I thought I could really take this further and my dad approached me and said, 'Son, come and join the industry' and he said 'I'll give you ve hundred quid' and in the Eighties that was a lot of money, so I went from hair down to my chest to shaved literally overnight.
I can't imagine lasting long as an accounting assistant either, given that it took me three attempts to pass a Maths O-Level.
Marvin Test Solutions said it has announced new enhancements to its MTS-3060 SmartCan, a universal O-level aircraft armament test set for legacy aircraft employing smart weapons.
ISLAMABAD -- Shahzaib Ali Abbasi, 18, has been declared top in the world for mathematics in the Cambridge O-level examinations held by the University of Cambridge, UK.
I was in Llanishen High School sixth form in 1983, and had achieved nine As at O-level, when the thought occurred to me - a girl from the council estate with an unemployed single parent: "Why shouldn't I apply?
However he did not state that in the days of O-level (a more difficult exam than GCSE), the boys gained better results at 16, went on to do better at A-level and gained more places at university, in spite of the fact than many boys regarded reading as 'sissy'.