obsessive-compulsive disorder

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obsessive-compulsive disorder

[əb¦ses·iv kəm′pəl·siv dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
A type of anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent, unwanted, and unpleasant thoughts (obsessions) or repetitive, purposeful, ritualistic behaviors that the person feels driven to perform (compulsions). Abbreviated OCD.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some scientists did not find association of the COMT variants with OCD (Umehara et al.
OCD is much more common than previously thought, says Keira.
India adds that she doesn't believe her OCD can be cured, but feels really positive in that she now knows how to handle it.
Anyone needing help and advice about OCD can call Mind Cymru's Infoline on 0300 123 3393 or visit www.
Onset of OCD usually occurs by young adulthood, but may be present in children.
Participants also showed significant reductions on both the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, effects that were sustained during follow-up, although the improvement in OCD symptoms was more impressive, he said.
Then, the brain of someone with OCD will mimic the same neural activity as someone without.
Key words: OCD, SLC6A4, gene expression, RT-PCR, Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale score(Y-BOCS).
This study provides some early indicators for a possible use of Withania somnifera in patients with OCD but further research is required.
Leaving the OCD Circus reveals the story of Pagacz's traumatic childhood and the escalation of her disorder?
However, persons with OCD experience high levels of anxiety due to the lack of control over their thoughts and the actions that follow.
Here's a brief summary of what OCD really is: OCD | (or obsessive compulsive disorder) affects just over 1% of the population - that's around 750,000 people in the UK.