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ohm

(ōm) [for G. S. OhmOhm, Georg Simon
, 1787–1854, German physicist. He was professor at Munich from 1852. His study of electric current led to his formulation of the law now known as Ohm's law. The unit of electrical resistance (see ohm) was named for him.
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], symbol Ω, unit of electrical resistanceresistance,
property of an electric conductor by which it opposes a flow of electricity and dissipates electrical energy away from the circuit, usually as heat. Optimum resistance is provided by a conductor that is long, small in cross section, and of a material that conducts
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, defined as the resistance in a circuit in which a potential difference of one volt creates a current of one ampere; hence, 1 ohm equals 1 volt/ampere. The megohm (1,000,000 ohms) and the milliohm (.001 ohm) are units derived from the ohm.

Ohm

 

the unit of electric resistance in the International System of Units (SI). It is named in honor of the German physicist G. S. Ohm.

The international symbol is Ω. One ohm is the resistance of a conductor between whose terminals a voltage of 1 volt arises when a current of 1 ampere is flowing through the conductor. The relationship between the ohm and the other units of electrical resistance is as follows: 1 Ω = 1.11 ×, 1012 cgs electrostatic units = 109 cgs electromagnetic units.

ohm

[ōm]
(electricity)
The unit of electrical resistance in the rationalized meter-kilogram-second system of units, equal to the resistance through which a current of 1 ampere will flow when there is a potential difference of 1 volt across it. Symbolized Ω.

ohm

The unit of electrical resistance of a conductor such that a constant current of 1 ampere in it produces a decrease in voltage across it of 1 volt.

ohm

the derived SI unit of electrical resistance; the resistance between two points on a conductor when a constant potential difference of 1 volt between them produces a current of 1 ampere.

Ohm

Georg Simon . 1787--1854, German physicist, who formulated the law named after him

Ohm

(unit)
The MKS unit of electrical resistance. One Ohm is the resistance of a conductor across which a potential difference of one Volt produces a current of one Ampere. Named after Georg Simon Ohm.

ohm

The unit of measurement of electrical resistance in a material. One ohm is the resistance in a circuit when one volt maintains a current of one amp. The symbol for ohm is the Greek letter omega. See impedance.

Ohm's Law
The equation "R=V/I" is the more streamlined version of the one developed by German physicist Georg Simon Ohm in 1827. Ohm's law is used to calculate the resistance in materials such as metal, which maintain a linear relationship between voltage and current. In addition, Ohm's formulas, which are derived from Ohm's Law, are used to calculate voltage and current if the other two measurements are known.
OHM'S LAWwResistance = voltage divided by current

   R = V / I   or   R = E / I


 OHM'S FORMULASVoltage = current times resistance

   V = I * R   or   E = I * R

 Current = voltage divided by resistance

   I = V / R   or   I = E / R

 V or E = voltage (E=energy)
      I = current in amps (I=intensity)
      R = resistance in ohms


 Electric PowerPower in watts = voltage times current

   P = V * I
References in periodicals archive ?
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The Walsh name may be familiar those who have followed this hobby for a while: the late Lincoln Walsh developed a unique driver approach in the early 1970s and Ohm introduced a Walsh-driver speaker with great fanfare.
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Experimentation proved that Ohm has it right with their suggestions: pulling the speakers out until they cleared the TV cabinet in the center improved imaging dramatically, and an asymmetrical placement eliminated a touch of bass boominess.
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