permissible exposure limit

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permissible exposure limit

[pər¦mis·ə·bəl ik′spō·zhər ‚lim·ət]
(industrial engineering)
The level of air contaminants that represents an acceptable exposure level as specified in standards set by a national government agency; generally expressed as 8-hour time-weighted average concentrations. Abbreviated PEL.
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References in periodicals archive ?
OPM not only promulgated an identical 8% differential pay for exposure to asbestos for general schedule employees, it also tied the payment of HDP to the OSHA PEL. 5 C.F.R.
Figure 1 shows the percent of employees personally monitored that were found to be in compliance with the OSHA PEL for CO each year.
The best available science, to our understanding, shows that the current OSHA PEL for quartz of 100 micrograms per cubic meter of air is appropriate to protect against silica-related disease, provided it is adhered to strictly.
The OSHA PEL was defined by a formula that included the percentage respirable silica (OSHA 2001).
Given an exposure of 0.11 fibers/cc, the 1.25 hour work period, unprotected, would result in an exposure level less than the OSHA PEL of 0.2 fibers/cc.
An OSHA plant inspection conducted after the diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis in the process helper documented one airborne cobalt level at 90% of the OSHA PEL. As a result of these two cases and the investigation findings reported here, the plant reviewed its industrial hygiene program for the metal-coating process and instituted a chest radiograph surveillance program for the approximately 40 coating-process employees.
If exposures are detected that approach or exceed the OSHA PEL, it is advisable to proceed directly to real-time engineering sampling methods.
However, neither method reduces worker lead exposures to levels below the OSHA PEL. In 1989, to meet the need for effective engineering controls in radiator repair shops, NIOSH researchers studied three exhaust-ventilation control systems for radiator shops.
Stack testing was undertaken on two dust collectors, and silica exposure results indicate control well within the OSHA PEL.