oat

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oat

1. an erect annual grass, Avena sativa, grown in temperate regions for its edible seed
2. the seeds or fruits of this grass
3. any of various other grasses of the genus Avena, such as the wild oat
4. Poetic Music a flute made from an oat straw
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

oat

[ōt]
(botany)
Any plant of the genus Avena in the family Graminae, cultivated as an agricultural crop for its seed, a cereal grain, and for straw.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These days, many cereals are pumped up with "isolated fibers" like inulin, oat fiber, corn fiber, and wheat fiber.
While some types of soluble fiber, such as oat fiber, are known to lower blood cholesterol, studies have not yet found this benefit for acacia fiber.
The 50-g nutrient bars contained 3.3 g of L-arginine as well as antioxidant vitamins and minerals, folic acid, and B vitamins in a soy protein and oat fiber base.
Oatrim is a powdered, soluble oat fiber that an ARS researcher in Peoria, Illinois, originally developed as a natural, low-calorie fat substitute in foods.
Inglett also has created a one-ounce chocolate bar containing Z-Trim, oat fiber, artificial sweetener and beta-glucan from Oatrim-10, another fat substitute he developed.
Anderson calls the findings a "meaningful and important" addition to the growing body of data that indicates "Americans must eat more oat fiber" to head off a variety of health problems.
While the first ingredient is whole-grain wheat flour, most of the crackers' extra fiber comes from the isolated oat fiber that Nabisco adds.
"Oat fiber" on the ingredient list can be either insoluble or soluble fiber.
Williams claims techniques have been developed and refined for concentrating oat fiber, while retaining the molecular structure of the oat bran/flour.
The scientists' objective was to use extrusion processing to increase the solubility of wheat bran and oat fiber. Fibers were extruded using a commercial co-rotating twin-screw extruder.
The soluble oat fiber - now called Quaker [TM] Oatrim 5 - has most of its natural oat cereal flavor removed by the processing technology, so it can be used in a wide variety of food products without affecting their flavor profiles.