oblate

(redirected from Oblates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

oblate

1
having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameter

oblate

2
a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
I consider Hildegard to be the patron saint of my becoming an oblate. She opened the door for me into this contemplative way of life that so resonated with who I was and how I longed to pray.
On July 4, 1433, it was approved by Pope Eugene IV as a religious community of Oblates with private religious vows known as Oblates of Saint Frances of Rome.
In the year 1425, she founded the Oblates of Mary, a lay congregation of pious women that gained papal approval in 1433.
There are currently an estimated 25,000 Oblates worldwide compared to 21,000 Benedictine monks and sisters.
As stated by the founder of the Oblates in 1853: "...every means should be used to bring the nomad tribes to abandon their wandering life and to build houses [and] cultivate fields." (37) Through religious teachings, missionaries were to re-organize Native relationships to the land and to each other and usher in a new era of higher and noble Christian living.
Over seventy pages of notes, a bibliography, and an index round out this thoughtful examination of cognitive concepts and (at times prejudiced) categorizations among oblates (individuals who have affiliated themselves with a monastic community, even though they are not themselves monks or nuns), particularly the oblates of Mary Immaculate at Ile-a-la-Crosse.
Jim Holland, of the Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples, was defended passionately by his parishioners, says Cree Elder Gilman Cardinal, who was among those to speak to representatives of the Oblates. He told them the church would suffer if the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate went through with its plan to transfer Holland.
And since oblates live out in the world and not in the convent, they are called to serve their own community, which could be a church community, neighbourhood or city, explained Samways Hiltz.
Father Baratto was the black sheep; he joined the Order of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate in 1947 as he wanted to be a Missionary and work among the natives in North America.
The rosy 75-year history of the presence in the country of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, or OMI, is one written in blood, sweat and tears of its Filipino and foreign missionaries, some of them jailed by the Japanese during World War II on suspicions they were spies of American forces.