oblique

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oblique

1. Geometry
a. (of lines, planes, etc.) neither perpendicular nor parallel to one another or to another line, plane, etc.
b. not related to or containing a right angle
2. Biology having asymmetrical sides or planes
3. (of a map projection) constituting a type of zenithal projection in which the plane of projection is tangential to the earth's surface at some point between the equator and the poles
4. Navigation the act of changing course by less than 90?
5. an aerial photograph taken at an oblique angle

oblique

[ə′blēk]
(anatomy)
Referring to a muscle, positioned obliquely and having one end that is not attached to bone.
(botany)
Referring to a leaf, having the two sides of a blade unequal.
(science and technology)
Having a slanted direction or position.
References in classic literature ?
The even tone has two variations differing from each other only in pitch; the oblique tone has three variations, known as "Rising, Sinking, and Entering.
By this oblique motion, the island is conveyed to different parts of the monarch's dominions.
He was clinging to the oblique stem of a palm-tree.
I recognized by the oblique feet that it was some extinct creature after the fashion of the Megatherium.
The Victoria was then taking an oblique line to the westward.
The first party consisted of Pfuel and his adherents- military theorists who believed in a science of war with immutable laws- laws of oblique movements, outflankings, and so forth.
But the projectile was perceptibly nearing the moon, and evidently succumbed to her influence to a certain degree; though its own velocity also drew it in an oblique direction.
Tables 3 and 4 below present the rates of plural verbal forms with plural obliques --both NN2 and people--in relation to the number of words separating the oblique itself from the verb in the BNC and COCA, respectively.
The public use of obliques is well-documented and is normally preferred by a spectrum of users to vertical aerial images, particularly at large-scale display because buildings and other features are more recognizable and, consequently, more intuitive and likely to be utilized.
When it comes to exercises that are aimed at boosting the strength of the core muscles, it is common for people to focus too heavily on forward "crunch"-based movements while neglecting to work the abdominal obliques, says David Thomas, MD, associate professor of medicine and rehabilitation medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
htm The external obliques are to each side of the rectus abdominis, and consist of both the front-lateral and "love handle" areas in the midsection.
Works on: improving control and strength of the buttocks, abdominals, lower back, obliques, anterior and posterior deltoids and tricep muscles.