Obol

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Obol’

 

an urban-type settlement in Shumilino Raion, Vitebsk Oblast, Byelorussian SSR, on the Obol’ River. It has a railroad station on the Vitebsk-Polotsk line, and the highway from Moscow to Riga passes through the settlement. Local plants produce bricks and pressed-peat insulating material. The settlement has a museum of komsomol glory, affiliated with the Byelorussian State Museum of the History of the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45.


Obol’

 

a river in Vitebsk Oblast, Byelorussian SSR; a right tributary of the Zapadnaia Dvina. It is 148 km long and drains an area of 2,690 sq km. After issuing from Lake Ezerishche (16,600 sq km), it flows through marshy lowlands. It is fed mainly by snow, and the average discharge 23 km from its mouth is 21.9 cu m per sec. The river freezes over in late November and breaks up in the second half of March or in April.


Obol

 

(1) A unit of weight and a silver, later copper, coin in ancient Greece, equal to 1/6 of a drachma.

(2) A bronze coin in Byzantium in the ninth and tenth centuries, equal to 1/2 of a follis.

(3) A copper coin in France in the ninth century, equal to 1/2 of a denier (a small coin, worth 1/12 of a sou or 1/240 of a livre, which remained in circulation until the early 19th century). The term “obol” (obole in French) was later applied to a silver coin, worth 4 denier in the time of Philip the Fair (1285–1314) and 7 1/2 denier under Charles IV (1322–28).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
1969 Obolus (Obolus) triangularis Mickwitz; Goryanskij, p.
Ungula inornata is the replacement name for Obolus triangularis Mickwitz, 1896.
According to cladistic analysis of the chemico-structural characters of the shell, Ungula is phylogenetically closely related to the genera Obolus Eichwald, 1829, Oepikites Khazanovitch & Popov, 1984 (in Khazanovitch et al.
The type species of the Cambrian genus Obolus Eichwald, 1829, O.
14, RnG = 28 kBq/[m.sup.3]; RnM = 94 kBq/[m.sup.3]) was observed when the soil with a background eU concentration was overlain by a dense and thick (> 20 cm) humus horizon and there existed an additional inflow of Rn from graptolite argillite and obolus phosphorite lying at a depth of 65-75 m.
The Rn potential of graptolite argillite and obolus phosphorite can be high, depending on the concentration of eU in rocks, reaching up to 1400 kBq/[m.sup.3] in graptolite argillite and up to 400 kBq/[m.sup.3] in obolus phosphorite.
As was mentioned above, in the study area the main sources of high Rn concentrations in soil air are the Lower-Ordovician U-rich rocks, graptolite argillite, and obolus sandstone (phosphorite), and among the Quaternary deposits, clasts and fines of the above-mentioned rocks and to a lesser extent the Quaternary deposits enriched with erratic granitoid material of the rapakivi formation.
The reason is presence of U-rich graptolite argillite and obolus phosphorite in the geological sequence and distribution of their clasts and fines in Quaternary deposits.
1) Alum shale and Obolus sandstone (phosphorite) with a high concentration of Rn.
Obolus apollinis Eichwald, 1829 is the type species of the genus Obolus, the type genus of the family Obolidae, which is one of the most diverse early Palaeozoic linguloid families (Popov & Holmer 2003).
The studied sample of Obolus apollinis originates from the locality on the right bank of the Lava River in the Leningrad district, where the rocks from the Upper Cambrian Ladoga Formation to the Middle Ordovician Kunda Stage are exposed (Fig.
The valves of Obolus apollinis Eichwald were picked out of the rock sample and cleaned.