Obshchestvennoe Pitanie

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Obshchestvennoe Pitanie

 

(Food Service), a monthly journal of the Ministry of Trade of the USSR. Published in Moscow since 1928. It is intended for workers in the food-service industry. The journal discusses the experience of operating advanced food-service enterprises, publishes suggestions for chefs and advice on the use of equipment, and news of foreign technology. Circulation, 325,000 (1974).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet alongside this prominent emphasis on efficiency and rationality, the pages of Obshchestvennoe pitanie (as well as women's magazines like Rabotnitsa) also offered ample evidence that meals and food were meant to be savored, that the Soviet consumer valued flavor and variety, an appreciation for the cultural meanings of dining in and dining out, and pleas for young people to consider making the culinary profession their career.
By the 1960s, the pages of Obshchestvennoe pitanie regularly offered instructions on preparing dishes from the USSR's ethnic regions for its audience of professional cooks and catering employees in their own kitchens.
A 1961 issue of Obshchestvennoe pitanie described the varying breakfast habits of foreign visitors, and a lengthy series in 1963 explained the "peculiarities" of foreign cuisines in some detail.
To test a hypothesis of an ever-expanding saturation of foreign dishes proposed for the Soviet diet, I constructed a data base of the recipes published in Obshchestvennoe pitanie from 1958 to 1973.
(94) Perhaps the proliferation of proposed international foods in Obshchestvennoe pitanie was a smokescreen to obscure these serious deficits, although the dozens of everyday vegetable dishes that were published were a clear enough acknowledgment of the prevailing shortages of meat.
Virtually every report of travel to Eastern or Western Europe that appeared in Obshchestvennoe pitanie marveled at the sidewalk cafes they encountered: tables "right on the sidewalk" in Athens, Paris, and Brussels, but also in Prague, Budapest, and Ljubljana.
The journal Obshchestvennoe pitanie, which served the restaurant economy, was similar in this regard: it concentrated on presentation and pairing rather than connoisseurship.
As one author profiling Kiknadze's role in promoting Georgian cuisine wrote in Obshchestvennoe pitanie: "Soviet culinary workers affirm the rule that cuisine in our country never was and never will be a secretive [zamknutoi], isolated part of national culture.
A 1965 article in Obshchestvennoe pitanie profiled Margo Aptsiauri and Omar Lebanidze, employees of a cafeteria by day and traditional Georgian folk dancers at Tbilisi's House of Culture by night.
Pol'sldi, "Vospitanie v trude," Obshchestvennoe pitanie, no.
Kiknadze, "Tak gotoviat bliudo 'tsypliata-tabaka,'" Obshchestvennoe pitanie, no.
(72) "Zharovnia i aromatizator dlia tsypliat-tabaka," Obshchestvennoe pitanie, no.