Obshchina


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Obshchina

 

(1) A revolutionary journal, of which one issue was published in London in September 1870. Its editors were S. G. Nechaev and V. I. Serebrenikov. The second issue, published in early 1871, was destroyed by Nechaev.

(2) A revolutionary journal published in Geneva from January to December 1878 by a group of Russian Bakuninist Narodniki (Populists). Nine issues were published (circulation, 1,000). Its editors were P. B. Aksel’rod, N. I. Zhukovskii, D. A. Klements, and Z. K. Ralli. S. M. Kravchinskii, V. N. Cherkezov, L. G. Deich, and Ia. V. Stefanovich were regular contributors. Also among those associated with the journal were M. P. Dragomanov and E. Reclus. The journal analyzed the results of the “going to the people” movement and published materials related to the Trial of 193, including I. N. Myshkin’s speech. Associated with Land and Liberty (Zemlia i Volia), the journal endeavored to unite various Populist currents “into a social-revolutionary party.”

References in periodicals archive ?
15) La denominacion proviene del Eslavo y significa union, corresponde a obshchina en ruso (Vasile, 2009)
Baklanova, Krest'ianskii dvor i obshchina na russkom Severe (konets XVII-nachalo XVIII v.
Penned after his and Engels' analysis of the failure of the Paris Commune and at the time of his correspondence with the Russian revolutionary Vera Zasulich about the progressive potential of the mir or obshchina, the village commune, the Notebooks discuss the family-household, work, kinship and their organisation, particularly in relation to the state.
Marx and Engels make a very significant argument in the preface to the Russian edition of the Communist Manifesto: "Now the question is: can the Russian obshchina, though greatly undermined, yet a form of primeval common ownership of land, pass directly to the higher form of Communist common ownership?
Pursuant to a June 2004 decision by the Arbitration Court of Sverdlovsk Oblast, an anti-Semitic newspaper, "Russkaya Obshchina Yekaterinburga," closed down.
With a large number of Russia's peasants still attached to the obshchina on the eve of the October 1917 Revolution (Getzler claims the figure was as high as 98 per cent), there was the distinct possibility that the view of Sukhanov and his like would prevail.
Then and now the Russian peasant showed himself fearful of losing the security of the obshchina or the kolkhoz.
The other primary approach lies in the (re)construction of aboriginal obshchina territories.
Bartlett does introduce critical concepts from Russian folk tradition, for example, the khorovod (ancient "mystical choral dance") and the obshchina (the commune), and explain how these cultural rites and features, especially as interpreted by Russian symbolists, equate to planks in Wagner's aesthetic platform.
They include an anarcho-syndicalist monthly, Obshchina ("Community"); a social democratic journal, Otkritaya Zona ("Open Zone"); and the Democratic Union's bulletin, Svobodnoe Slovo ("Free Word"), which stands alongside publications of the neo-Stalinist Russian nationalist Pamyat ("Memory") Society.
Now the question is: can the Russian obshchina, though greatly undermined, yet a form of the primeval common ownership of land, pass directly to the higher form of communist common ownership?