Obsolete building

Obsolete building

A building that for one reason or another has reached the end of its current useful life.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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The 110,000 sq ft building was named best commercial workplace after judges called the project a "complete transformation" of a previously obsolete building, praising its dramatic front entrance and generous communal roof garden.
The report found that although prison staff employees have done an "admirable job" working in an obsolete building, the to-do list for repairs and improvements is almost insurmountable, touching on everything from tunnels and sewer lines to electrical, mechanical and plumbing systems.
By 2014, deficiencies with the existing HVAC system included failed outdoor air and relief air dampers, an obsolete building automation system that was not supported, excessive humidity levels and accompanying issues, poor thermal comfort, as well as high maintenance and repair costs.
"If not, they'll be the ones holding the bag, sitting there with an obsolete building with little or no value."
This future-proof element from an early planning stage is highly recommended, in fact could reduce the probability of a prematurely obsolete building design.
During most of the last decade, the district has been trying to sell the three-story brick and functionally obsolete building.
"Armenia International Airports will not allocate resources for maintaining an obsolete building and will also not bear any
Office occupier requirements will continue in this vein, meaning any stock that does not meet modern workplace trends is unlikely to ever be let again and while not every obsolete building can be converted a fair proportion could be."
Nicholson, who ran the Ayer's Cliff Centre for Solar Research in Quebec, introduced to our readers his Autonomous House project, which he described as providing "viable alternatives to obsolete building practices." In a series of articles, Nick documented the house's construction.
Regulatory missteps cited include misuse of smart-growth principles, impact fees beyond the actual costs of the needed infrastructure, and obsolete building codes.
And the former Schenley plant has new tenants, lured with Indiana's new Obsolete Building Reinvestment Act, the Dinosaur Building program.