oceanic crust

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oceanic crust

[‚ō·shē′an·ik ′krəst]
(geology)
A thick mass of igneous rock which lies under the ocean floor.
References in periodicals archive ?
at the antipodal location of 2 minute trapezoids for ETOPO2 model Northern hemisphere ocean land ocean continental crust crust Southern ocean 116 207 742 (a) 90 298 294 (b) hemisphere ocean crust 69 665 648 100 490 498 land 38 340 687 (c) 10 185 275 (d) continental 45 504 292 42 371 559 crust Note.
Researchers from the University of Southampton have identified regions beneath the oceans where the igneous rocks of the upper ocean crust could safely store very large volumes of carbon dioxide.
A third surprise, Snow says, casts doubt on one of the main theories of the construction of the lower ocean crust.
It offered a glimpse of the structure and composition of the ocean crust.
Off the coast of Washington state, other researchers have watched microbes creep into and colonize a borehole 280 meters below the seafloor, flushed by water circulating through the ocean crust.
A recent theory of catastrophic plate tectonics with extremely rapid formation of new ocean crust and magnetic reversals has been proposed and demonstrated in the past three decades.
Research will address structure and seismic behaviour of the ocean crust, dynamics of hot and cold fluids and gas hydrates in the upper ocean crust and overlying sediments, ocean circulation and climate change and their effects on the ocean biota, as well as deep-sea ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity.
The deep ocean crust, the researchers point out, is an immense biosphere in its own right that covers most of the Earth.
At deep-sea trenches, the ocean crust plunged deep into the Earth's mantle triggering major earthquakes.
The process of serpentinization occurs when water gravitates down cracks in hot, newly formed ocean crust, where it reacts chemically with the minerals in the rocks in a reaction that produces an extremely alkaline (pH ~13) effluent, rich in hydrogen and methane and the metal molybdenum, so important as a catalyst in life.
Hess Medal for "outstanding achievements in research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets," notably "his many discoveries, creative efforts and deep insights that have led to the modern understanding of the mantle melting and ocean crust formation along the global ocean ridges.

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