ocean basin

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ocean basin

[′ō·shən ′bā·sən]
(geology)
The great depression occupied by the ocean on the surface of the lithosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the Maastrichtian time, the globe can be tectonically divided into two distinct hemispheres; one dominated by deep oceanic basin of the Pacific and the other consisting of well-dispersed continents originated form Laurasia and Gondwana (Hunter et al., 2008).
The simulations consist in nine runs where the model is fully coupled in the tropical Indo-Pacific oceanic basin (between 30[degrees]S and 30[degrees]N) and forced with climatological SSTs elsewhere, apart from the Atlantic sector, where the model is forced by ob served monthly varying SSTs from 1949 to 2002.
While the major oceanic basins are usually examined separately when identifying the main climate variability phenomena, what stands out is the related nature of the global patterns and some similarities in their temporal evolutions.
"A delicate balance must be struck between the volume of water it retains over time, and how much space it has to store it in its oceanic basins," the (https://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/2976-oceans-galore-new-study-suggests-most-habitable-planets-may-lack-dry-land) report said.
The first expedition (IIOE) was launched 50 years when the global marine science community, including representatives from South Africa, recognised that the Indian Ocean and its dynamics were poorly understood compared to more studied oceanic basins, in terms of threats and opportunities as well as ecosystem and planetary functions.
"The frequencies of tropical cyclones increase and decrease over all oceanic basins during the phenomenon El Nino and El Nino Modoki over the years.
Eleven papers from an October 2007 conference examine the origin of oceanic basins and processes that contribute to horizontal extension of the continental lithosphere.
One approach is to use digital terrain models (DTM) showing the forms of mountain ranges, oceanic trenches, volcanic ridges and island arcs, and oceanic basins to constrain models of the processes that produced them.
Ostensibly, the author is describing the birth, life, and eventual eroding away of one of the earth's most significant oceanic basins. In actuality, she is leading the reader across the geography and probable weather patterns of the titanic proto-continent Pangea, eons before Atlantic began as a chain of shallow lakes along a minor depression.
The introductory chapter, Frozen Oceans, describes the geography of the polar oceanic basins, the ocean currents, and the annual cycles of sea ice extent.
A (https://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/2976-oceans-galore-new-study-suggests-most-habitable-planets-may-lack-dry-land) report from the Royal Astronomical Society explains that if a planet were to have substantial land and water coverage, "a delicate balance must be struck between the volume of water it retains over time, and how much space it has to store it in its oceanic basins."
Researchers paid particular attention to whirlpools and to deep-water formations, which act as "conveyor belts" to connect all oceanic basins on Earth.