odds ratio

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odds ratio

[′ädz ‚rā·shō]
(statistics)
The ratio of the probability of occurrence of an event to the probability of the event not occurring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with PN had elevated odds of eating disorders, self-harm, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, mood disorder, anxiety, and substance use disorders (odds ratios, 4.66, 3.17, 2.89, 2.26, 2.24, 1.93, and 1.62, respectively).
Epidemiologists and clinical researchers often estimate logit models and report odds ratios. Economists might estimate logit, probit, or linear probability models, but they tend to report marginal effects.
genetic profiles based on sets of risk markers can potentially identify rare highrisk and low-risk subgroups with large relative differences in risk (that is, with odds ratios greater than 10).
Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for smoking were adjusted for age and study.
In contrast, the odds ratios for the association between IBD and rheumatoid arthritis from three adult studies ranged from 1.4 to 2.4, while one study looking at IBD and lupus in adults showed an odds ratio of just 1.3.
Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for renal insufficiency using healthy/gingivitis as the referent group.
A history of eating disorders or miscarriage also were significant predictors of postpartum depression, with odds ratios of 6.5 and 7.5, respectively.
Odds ratios for these outcomes were calculated using logistic regression.
The odds ratios for early childhood death in those born extremely preterm (from 22 to 27 weeks' gestation) were 6.1 for males and 8.7 for females, and for those born very preterm (28-32 weeks' gestation), the odds ratios were 2.5 for males and 2.1 for females.
Odds ratios for bacterial eradication favored the shorter cephalosporin regimen for the 9 combined European trials (1.30) and even more so in the 3 U.S.
Adjustments for other confounding variables and effect modifiers--including maternal smoking, education, folic acid use, and gravidity--did not have a significant effect on the odds ratios, Ms.
There is still considerable confusion and debate about the appropriate methods for analyzing prevalence studies, and a number of recent papers have argued that prevalence ratios are the preferred method and that prevalence odds ratios should not be used.
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