Grecian urn

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Grecian urn

lovers depicted on it will be forever young. [Br. Poetry: Keats “Ode on a Grecian Urn”]
References in classic literature ?
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines."
Which romantic poet wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn? 20.
In what follows, I want to examine in detail the intertextual relation between "Ode on a Grecian Urn" and "Toccata," seeing the latter as a classic intertextual absorption of and reply to the earlier text.
According to William Fitzgerald in his Agonistic Poetry: the Pindaric Mode in Pindar, Horace, Holderlin, and the English Ode, William Jackson Bate commented on Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn" writing that "the theme of much of the greater poetry to come--certainly of the 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' and the 'Ode to a Nightingale'--may be described as the drama of the human spirits 'greeting' of objects in order 'to make them wholly exist'" (Bate qtd.
Probably the most famous ending in literature is the enigmatic conclusion of Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn":
His interest in Provencal thought, medieval knighthood and Troubadour concept of separation, suffering in love and a haughty domna(mistress) can be discerned in the poems like La Belle Dame Sans Merci, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn and The Eve of the St.
While living next door to her in Hampstead in North London, Keats wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy and Ode to a Nightingale.
From the venerable Chinese I Jing, Book of Changes, Keats' "Ode on a Grecian Urn," and Goethe's Werther, to modern/ postmodern evocations of odes such as Pablo Neruda's "Ode to a Chestnut on the Ground," Osamu Tezuka's Ode to Kirihito in manga (graphic novel) form, and the "Ode to the Motherland" which inaugurated the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, Eisenhauer (PhD, comparative literature and German, Johns Hopkins U.) analyzes Eastern and Western variations on the theme of this genre which entails what has been called a "haunted sensibility" of mythology, spiritual thirst, intimacy, and surprise.
Stillinger illustrates Keats's "canonical complexity" (120) by analyzing Ode on a Grecian Urn as a poem that both celebrates and finds fault with the realms of the ideal and the real.
Milton Babbitt: "Phonemena," "The Waltzer in the House," "Now Evening After Evening," "Pantun." Chester Biscardi: "Baby Song of the Four Winds," "Recovering," "Guru." Mel Powell: "Levertov Breviary." Tobias Picker: "Native Trees," "To the Insects," "Half a Year Together," "When We Meet Again," "not even the rain." David Rakowski: "Musician," "Georgie," "Sara." Three Encores:"Vocal Ease," "Scatter," "Vocal Angst." Christopher Berg: "Ode on a Grecian Urn."
Apparently there has long been controversy about the meaning of this conclusion to Keats's Ode On A Grecian Urn, with T S Eliot (a jealous mug on this occasion?) even going so far as to describe it as "a blight on an otherwise beautiful poem".
During the summer of 1998, I taught a summer school World Literature class at Tyler Junior College, and my class focused on John Keats' "Ode on a Grecian Urn." As we explored Stanza II, in which Keats proclaims, "Heard Melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on" (Norton, p.604), I told the class about the record in the furrow, and how I often wonder if it contained the "Sicilian Tarantella" or the Meisterbrau Showcase theme.