Grecian urn

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Grecian urn

lovers depicted on it will be forever young. [Br. Poetry: Keats “Ode on a Grecian Urn”]
References in classic literature ?
The Ode on a Grecian Urn is more lovely now than when it was written, because for a hundred years lovers have read it and the sick at heart taken comfort in its lines.
His interest in Provencal thought, medieval knighthood and Troubadour concept of separation, suffering in love and a haughty domna(mistress) can be discerned in the poems like La Belle Dame Sans Merci, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn and The Eve of the St.
While living next door to her in Hampstead in North London, Keats wrote Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy and Ode to a Nightingale.
Stillinger illustrates Keats's "canonical complexity" (120) by analyzing Ode on a Grecian Urn as a poem that both celebrates and finds fault with the realms of the ideal and the real.
Apparently there has long been controversy about the meaning of this conclusion to Keats's Ode On A Grecian Urn, with T S Eliot (a jealous mug on this occasion?
Keats's declaration in the Ode on a Grecian Urn that "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard / Are sweeter" understandably resonates through After the Heavenly Tune, and that poem and the Ode to a Nightingale receive much attention in the section on Keats.
Agnes, The, the great odes (Ode on Indolence, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode to Psyche, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on Melancholy, and To Autumn), and the two versions of Hyperion.
He wrote "La Belle Dame Sanskrit Merci, " a haunting and mysterious ballad, and began to compose his great odes " Ode on Melancholy, " Ode on a Grecian Urn, " Ode to Psyche, " Ode to a Nightingale -- adapting elements of the rhyme - scheme of both Petrarchan and Shakespearean sonnets.
His latest sprint ace reaches further back for her name, to the poem Ode on a Grecian Urn, written in 1819 by John Keats (pictured).
13) Thus, Jacob Wigod, "Keats's Ideal in the Ode on a Grecian Urn," in Twentieth Century Interpretations of Keats's Odes, ed.
Patterson reviewed the earlier Platonist readings from an anti-Platonist perspective in "Passion and Permanence in Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn," in Twentieth Century.
The title of this engaging new book on Keats's odes appears to make "contemporary criticism" a principal subject; the preface proclaims the four "dominant critical paradigms of the present" to be the New Criticism, Paul de Manian deconstruction, the New Historicism, and Freudian psychoanalysis; and the contents page shows that each of the book's four chapters is devoted to one of Keats's major odes--in order, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode on Melancholy, and To Autumn.