Odin

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Odin,

Norse god: see WodenWoden
, Norse Odin
, in Germanic religion and mythology, the supreme god. His cult, although widespread among the Germanic tribes, was sometimes subordinated to that of his son Thor.
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Odin

 

the supreme god in Scandinavian mythology. Odin is endowed with the traits of a mighty shaman and sage. He is the god of war and discord and the master of Valhalla; the Valkyries are under his command. Odin corresponds to Woden (Wotan) of the ancient Germans on the continent.

Odin

god of farming. [Norse Myth.: Benét, 728]
See: Farming

Odin

god who presided over feasts of slain warriors. [Norse Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 774]
See: War

Odin

god; drank from fountain, became all-knowing. [Norse Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 774]
See: Wisdom

Odin

, Othin
Norse myth the supreme creator god; the divinity of wisdom, culture, war, and the dead

Odin

An earlier open source emulator for OS/2 that ran 32-bit Windows applications. The Odin project team was based in Germany, hence, the name Odin, which means "chief god" in Norse and Teutonic mythology. For more information, visit http://en.os2.org/projects/odin.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is suggestive, though, that, as I have shown, these elements do provide linked answers--and significantly, slightly unsatisfactory ones--to central questions which the absence of the element of Odinic sacrifice leaves hanging: the misdetoe becomes (improbably) lethal because of its exclusion from the inviolability oath, not because of an Odinic transformation; the game of target practice offers a (rather unseemly) context for the harmless throwing of weapons at Baldr, in place of a ritual which needs Odinn's intervention to make it lethally effective; Hodr's blindness enables (to a certain extent) Loki's manipulated accident in place of Odinn's mysterious but purposeful sacrifice of his son.
In the presence of Odinic intervention, the more physically unsuitable the mistletoe as a weapon, the more dramatic the transformation.
In conclusion, then, it may be that Snorri's account of the death of Baldr owes almost as much to Christian and, eventually, Jewish tradition as to earlier Norse myth, though it is impossible to say whether Snorri's failure to present the death of Baldr as an Odinic act was due to ignorance or distaste.