Odishi

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Odishi

 

a village near the city of Zugdidi, in the Georgian SSR, near which the Soviet archaeologist A. N. Kalandadze in 1936 and 1937 excavated a Neolithic site with an area of approximately 1½ hectares. Among the finds were flint microliths—primarily various kinds of insets—stone pestles, grinders, hoes, and axes, some of which were polished. The pottery included small flat-bottomed pots without handles but with holes near the rim for cords; the pots were decorated with incised, dashed lines and impressions of grain. The Odishi complex is characteristic of the culture of the early pottery Neolithic of the Western Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Piotrovskii, B. B. Arkheologiia Zakavkaz’ia. Leningrad, 1949. Page 26.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Referred to as the 'heritage village', this unique village occupies a prominent position in the cultural map of the country, drawing both national and international tourists who visit the place to enjoy the rich traditions of Odishi arts and crafts at one place.
A troupe of Odishi dancers lightened up the festive spirit with their cultural extravanganza which was witnessed by the chief minister herself.
The inaugural evening of the five-day long festival on Saturday saw dancers performing to the Indian classical dance forms of Odishi and Kuchipudi.