Oedipal


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Oedipal

[′ēd·ə·pəl]
(psychology)
Pertaining to the Oedipus complex.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many have argued that sibling experiences would interconnect with oedipal experiences and fantasies (Coles, 2003; Mitchell, 2003, 2011; Sharpe & Rosenblatt, 1994).
At the end of the pre-oedipal stage, the child eventually realizes that her mother is a being separate from her and begins the period of psychological separation, a primordial characteristic of the oedipal period that will last until the girl enters maturity.
Spinx, who is referred to as Papa by the Duchess (MF 90), serves as the father substitute and as the paternal figure that splits the mother and the children, analogous to the Oedipal complex.
Rudd in fact claims that Gaiman's text 'uncannily' provides a blueprint for the oedipal process.
(2) Freud's revisionary account of Moses as oedipal father, an account that centers on competing representational methods, on an antithesis between the material (maternal) image and the intangible (paternal) word, provides a useful heuristic model, as well as a point of contrast, for analyzing the implications of James's later style.
In his mother's absence, Alfredo does not begin his journey in the midst of an Oedipal journey, like most Spanish Romantic heroes.
Here Buchanan spends much of his time exploring Freudian and Oedipal motifs in Sons and Lovers.
The desired outcome of the Oedipal phase is that the five- or six-year-old boy should view himself as the Oedipal loser rather than the Oedipal victor.
Vallury is to be applauded for her ambitious attempt at the impossible task of locating twentieth-century self-deconstructing gender-bending in canonical nineteenth-century male-authored French narratives which, as bourgeois dramas, are by definition heterosexist and OEdipal. She is right to point out that the 1980s feminists often overstated their case that male authors suppressed unruly feminine desire, but she in turn overstates her own case that unruly feminine desire somehow unravels these tightly woven stories.
It is well known that, early in his career, Freud abandoned the idea of an "Electra" complex running parallel to the little boy's Oedipal struggle.
In the next chapter, however, Kucich's insistence that Olive Schreiner "submerged oedipal within preoedipal masochism" leaves the reader in much murkier territory (92).