Oedipal phase


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Oedipal phase

[′ēd·ə·pəl ‚fāz]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the period of psychosexual development that represents a time of conflict between the child and parents, lasting approximately from 4 to 6 years of age.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Having made this argument, Lau also explains that the deep bond between mother and daughter in the story challenges Freud's Oedipal structure: "the avenging mother undercuts the importance of both vision (Freud) and language (Lacan) to psychoanalytic theories of the Oedipal phase, castration anxiety and subjectivity" (35).
Later on, during the Oedipal phase and under the threat of castration, the child may accept civilization's offer of a mother-surrogate as imaginative compensation for the loss of the mother.
According to Freudian theory, the Oedipal phase takes place between the third and fifth years of a boy's life.
[15] Philip ostensibly never had the chance to work through his oedipal phase with his mother dying shortly after his birth, making his newly kindled desire for her quite strong.
Although the Oedipal phase is the same for both sexes insofar as it is held together by the fantasy of reanimating a totemic mother, boys and girls give up the object on entirely different hands.
According to Kristeva, the 'Imaginary Father' fulfills an archaic paternal function in the infant's mind, preceding chronologically the Oedipal phase and even the 'mirror stage'.
He has never passed through the Oedipal phase since he has no father to bury.
So while the ghost comedies feature gender stereotypes and heterosexual romance plots, the films also allow access to the feminine/maternal prior to the fixed gender identities of the Oedipal phase. Indeed, the subtext of the genre is that "the masochist seeks to expel the father and glorify the mother" (54).