Office of Price Administration


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Office of Price Administration

(OPA), U.S. federal agency in World War II, established to prevent wartime inflation. The OPA issued (Apr., 1942) a general maximum-price regulation that made prices charged in Mar., 1942, the ceiling prices for most commodities. Ceilings were also imposed on residential rents. These regulations were gradually modified and extended by OPA administrators—notably Leon HendersonHenderson, Leon,
1895–1986, American economist, administrator of the Office of Price Administration (1941–42), b. Millville, N.J. An official of the Russell Sage Foundation (1925–34), Henderson held several posts as economic adviser in the administration of
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 (1941–42), Prentiss H. Brown (1943), and Chester B. BowlesBowles, Chester Bliss
, 1901–86, U.S. public official, b. Springfield, Mass.; grandson of Samuel Bowles (1851–1915). At first a journalist and an advertising man, Bowles was later (1942–43) head of the Connecticut Office of Price Administration (OPA) and then
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 (1943–46)—until almost 90% of the retail food prices were frozen. Prices continued to rise, however, and new drives to secure compliance resulted; ultimately the OPA succeeded in keeping consumer prices relatively stable during the remaining war years. Besides controlling prices, the OPA was also empowered to ration scarce consumer goods in wartime. Tires, automobiles, sugar, gasoline, fuel oil, coffee, meats, and processed foods were ultimately rationed. At the end of the war rationing was abandoned, and price controls were gradually abolished. The agency was finally disbanded in 1947.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A pamphlet that he co-authored with George Stigler, "Roofs or Ceilings," leads off the argument against rationing of rent-controlled apartments by the Office of Price Administration as follows: "The defects in our present method of rationing by landlords are obvious and weighty.
He also remains known for his stints of public service, which include heading the Office of Price Administration in the 1940s and his term as President John F.
There's lots more, about the Office of Price Administration during the second world war, the wine bust of 1947, the fact that per capita consumption passed a gallon in 1946.
He then moved to Washington, D.C., where he remained until 1948, first as assistant to the administrator of the Office of Price Administration (1942-46), and then as assistant administrator of the National Housing Administration, as it was then called (1946-48).
The Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply (OPACS, but better known as OPA) was established with limited powers to recommend price control measures.
The steel industry resisted capacity expansion, and automobile executives fought industrial conversion; government controls, however, developed farther during the so-called defense period than tbey had at any point during the First World War Vatter continues the exploration of wartime administration in chapters 4, 5, and 6 with discussions of the War Production Board, the Office of Price Administration, and federal fiscal and monetary policies.
Taggart, certified public accountant, holds a high position in the Office of Price Administration. (Carey 1942)
Congress and the Office of Price Administration got to work setting prices for farm-produced foods, as the administration took charge of retail food distribution.
In that position he found himself on the forefront of the battle against President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal collectivism, opposing the depredations of such alphabet soup federal agencies as the OPA (Office of Price Administration) and NLRB (National Labor Relations Board).
The Office of Price Administration relied on local offices for advice on price ceilings and for checking on compliance.
The OPA (Office of Price Administration) seemed to view this arrangement as a circumvention of the ceiling on the consumer price of wine.
During World War II, the Office of Price Administration did the theoretically impossible by keeping prices steady at a time of shortages and rapidly rising incomes.

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