Ogata Kenzan


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Ogata Kenzan

(ōgä`tä kĕn`zän) 1663–1743, Japanese potter and painter; younger brother of Ogata KorinOgata Korin
, 1658–1716, Japanese decorator and painter. He is renowned for his lacquer work and paintings on screens, decorated with bold designs and striking color contrasts, and his masterful compositional use of empty space.
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. A follower of the Rimpa school, he set up kilns for the production of ceramics in the early to mid-Edo period. Proficient in the art of ceramic design and decoration, many of his pieces were of a smokey dark brown color. He also invented a ware entitled Kenzan-yaki. Most of his work was done in underglaze technique, with a number of porcelains utilizing overglaze enamels. His painting style was lyrical, although held not to be the equivalent of his brother's more renowned style.
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3) Leach's support for the authenticity of the Sano ceramics of Ogata Kenzan, discovered in 1962, (elsewhere held to be fakes) became a touchstone for the burial of Leach's aesthetic judgement.
The paired screens, Plum Tree and Hollyhocks, presented as by Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), have not been exhibited since the mid 1970s, and have been repeatedly excluded from exhibitions of the Burke collection to which they belong.
Books that include pictures of the work of master Japanese potters: Sasaki Chojiro (1516-92), Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) and Kitaoji Rosanjin (1883-1959)
Much like Japanese calligraphy master Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), Hodgins shared the inclination to paint prepared forms as they came off the potter's wheel.