Ogata Kenzan


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Ogata Kenzan

Ogata Kenzan (ōgäˈtä kĕnˈzän) 1663–1743, Japanese potter and painter; younger brother of Ogata Korin. A follower of the Rimpa school, he set up kilns for the production of ceramics in the early to mid-Edo period. Proficient in the art of ceramic design and decoration, many of his pieces were of a smokey dark brown color. He also invented a ware entitled Kenzan-yaki. Most of his work was done in underglaze technique, with a number of porcelains utilizing overglaze enamels. His painting style was lyrical, although held not to be the equivalent of his brother's more renowned style.
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(3) Leach's support for the authenticity of the Sano ceramics of Ogata Kenzan, discovered in 1962, (elsewhere held to be fakes) became a touchstone for the burial of Leach's aesthetic judgement.
The paired screens, Plum Tree and Hollyhocks, presented as by Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), have not been exhibited since the mid 1970s, and have been repeatedly excluded from exhibitions of the Burke collection to which they belong.
* Books that include pictures of the work of master Japanese potters: Sasaki Chojiro (1516-92), Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) and Kitaoji Rosanjin (1883-1959)
Much like Japanese calligraphy master Ogata Kenzan (1663-1743), Hodgins shared the inclination to paint prepared forms as they came off the potter's wheel.