Oglala Sioux


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Oglala Sioux:

see SiouxSioux
or Dakota,
confederation of Native North American tribes, the dominant group of the Hokan-Siouan linguistic stock, which is divided into several separate branches (see Native American languages).
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in periodicals archive ?
While the settler gaze has moved away from the Oglala Sioux with the news cycle, Two Spirits remain on the frontlines of environmental and climate justice struggles across Turtle Island.
(28) It is operated by the Oglala Sioux Tribe pursuant to a BIA contract.
Imagine that a client has a civil dispute with either the Oglala Sioux Tribe itself or one of its members.
In South Dakota, the Oglala Sioux Tribal Council this year rejected a proposal to allow marijuana.
South Dakota is a state where 10 percent of the population is Native American, and SDSU rests on the historical territory of tribes (presently known as the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; Crow Creek Sioux Tribe; Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe; Lower Brule Sioux Tribe; Oglala Sioux Tribe; Rosebud Sioux Tribe; Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; and Yankton Sioux Tribe) indigenous to this area.
Featured in this issue is an interesting series of lithographically printed postcards of Oglala Sioux Wild West show performers, published by the Illustrated Postal Card Company of New York and copyrighted in 1901 by William H.
-- Gerald One Feather, the legendary Oglala Sioux leader, former tribal president and tireless advocate for educational opportunities, has died.
Custer's Last Battle is a gorgeously illustrated, fictionalized yet well-researched account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn told from the point of view of a fifteen-year-old Oglala Sioux warrior.
Three Indian parents, as well as the Oglala Sioux Tribe and Rosebud Sioux Tribe, claim that the State Department of Social Services has repeatedly removed children from their homes or tribes without due process--in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S.
James Czywczynski is demanding $3.9 million for the site when it's been appraised at $7,000, making him no better than the 7th Calvary troopers who murdered 300 Oglala Sioux there in 1890.
He stood with the tribal nations, a stance so firm that the Oglala Sioux of South Dakota called him "the Great White Eagle."