Ogygia


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Ogygia

(ōjĭj`ēə): see CalypsoCalypso
, nymph, daughter of Atlas, in Homer's Odyssey. She lived on the island of Ogygia and there entertained Odysseus for seven years. Although she offered to make him immortal if he would remain, Odysseus spurned the offer and continued his journey.
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85: Hesiod says that Ogygia is within towards the west, but Ogylia lies over against Crete: `.
is holding him as a prisoner of love on the island of Ogygia.
Gavdos is one of the places that claims to be the island of Ogygia where the goddess Calypso kept Odysseus prisoner, although the supporting evidence is slight: in terms of flora, fauna and geography, it fails to tick almost any of the right boxes.
According to legend, Mljet is the beautiful island of Ogygia where the nymph Calypso kept Odysseus captive for seven years.
Odysseus drifted hopelessly on that small log, lost and alone, until he washed ashore on Ogygia, where he becomes captive of the beautiful goddess Calypso for seven long years.
Experience and the imagination can no longer accompany one another on the voyage to Ogygia, and both suffer and decline, the latter starved of sensory detail, the former chilled by its own indifference (128).
22) The partiality of English accounts of Ireland was a common complaint in the late-seventeenth century, despite counter-chronicles such as Peter Walsh's A Prospect of Ireland (1652) and Roderick O'Flaherty's Ogygia (1685).
Another major figure is Calypso, the nymph who keeps Odysseus captive in Ogygia (Od.
It may also be seen as an authorial device whereby a transition is effected from the events described in book 5, which record Odysseus's life with Calypso in Ogygia, to his first adventure with the Cicones, as recollected in book 9.
According to local lore, it is the very island of Ogygia, where the nymph Calypso rescued Odysseus and enslaved him as her lover.
160-72), and Circe and Calypso had both seduced Odysseus in the islands of Aeaea and Ogygia.
It perhaps means "the Traveller to England," for Plutarch connects the Homeric island Ogygia with Britain: he locates it in the Ocean, "a run of five days off from Britain as you sail westward" (Moralia 941 a).