Ohthere


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Ohthere

(ōthēr`ə), fl. 880, Norse explorer. His account of his voyage around the North Cape, along Lapland, and into the White Sea was incorporated by Alfred the Great in the introduction to his Anglo-Saxon translation of OrosiusOrosius, Paulus
, c.385–420, Iberian priest, theologian, and historian, b. Tarragona, Spain or Braga, Portugal. He went to see St. Augustine (c.413) and wrote, on request, a summary of the errors of Priscillian and of Origen. Augustine then sent him to Palestine to warn St.
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' universal history and was requoted by HakluytHakluyt, Richard
, 1552?–1616, English geographer. He graduated in 1574 from Oxford, where he later lectured on geography. A passionate interest in the history of discovery led him to collect and publish narratives of voyages and travels.
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 in his Principal Navigations. Another voyage of Ohthere southward along the Norwegian coast and to Denmark furnished additional information on the geography of N Europe.
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The earliest known record of this practice is the AD 890 account to King Alfred of England by the northern Norwegian Viking chieftain Ohthere, who reported payment of taxes by the Sami with feathers and down (Bately and Englert, 2007).
Ross, The Terfinnas and Beormas of Ohthere (Leeds, 1940; 2nd ed.
Set in 880AD, it centres on Ohthere, the Jarl of Bjartoy, whose settlement is razed to the ground by his enemy Sulke while he is away.
Drawing upon Bede, the Old English Orosius, and on cartographical evidence, this chapter contributes significantly to our understanding of geographical ideas in early England, bringing interesting material together and offering exciting readings in particular of the voyages of Ohthere and Wulfstan in the Orosius.
We should not forget that Ohthere, a Norwegian tradesman dealing with walrus ivory and furs, enjoyed King Alfred's hospitality.
King Alfred certainly expressed an interest in walrushide ropes when visited by the north Norwegian merchant Ohthere.
Onela's brother Ohthere (Ottar Vendelkraka) lies under the great mound later to be known as Ottarshogen at nearby Husby.
In twelve lines from the Ohthere interpolation in the OE Orosius (p.
In the sequel to this first phase of the Swedish feud, the poet tells how Heardred, Hygelac's son, met his death for intervening in Swedish internal politics by extending hospitality to the rebellious sons of Ohthere, son of Ongentheow and then ruler of the Swedes:
As an illustration of early interest in Germany of this account(2) the following notice of the voyages of Ohthere and Wulfstan may be worth recording: Christian Ulrich Grupen, Origines Germaniae-oder das alteste Teutschland unter den Romern, Franken und Sachsen, I (Lemgo: Meyersche Buchhandlung, 1764), 415:
In Book I the disappearance of ie begins precisely with the voyages of Ohthere and Wulfstan (pages 13-17 of Bately's edition), a famously obvious insertion from some other source.
Onela, Ohthere, Eanmund, and Eadgils, members of the Swedish royal family.