Ecumene

(redirected from Oikoumene)

Ecumene

 

(Greek oikumene), a term that was used to designate the part of the earth inhabited by man. The ecumene was first described by Hecataeus of Miletus, who included Europe (except northern Europe), Asia Minor, Southwest Asia, India, and North Africa in the concept of ecumene.

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It is the Pauline admonition (Mahnrede (2)) in Ephesians 4:1-6 that motivates dialogue partners of the oikoumene to seek clarity in the complexities of diverse doctrines and practices of baptism and possible mutual acknowledgement.
The oikoumene would then truly represent the whole inhabited world.
This sectarian behavior is amplified as Jews (a) go out into the larger world of the Oikoumene, but also (b) as Israel's political (and hence social) autonomy is repeatedly compromised and ultimately destroyed.
And that led me to another understanding of the word "ecumenical," which comes from the Greek word oikou-mene, from a psalm that says "the earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the oikoumene and all that dwell therein.
The name refers to the medieval Greek concept of the Roman oikoumene (inhabited world), which embraced Rome and western Europe as well as the "New Rome," Constantinople, and the Byzantine Empire with its Balkin Slavic commonwealth.
For more information on the assembly or the WCC, see oikoumene.
187-98), who looks at synodoi and the oikoumene, and stresses the identification of Orthodoxy with the creed of Christ being homoousios with the Father.
If the Gospel's trajectory is toward the saints' sovereignty over the oikoumene, then Constantine is not a betrayal of the Gospel but, in some degree, its fulfillment.
In the core of these communities' beliefs, Jerusalem is simply the property of the umma or the oikoumene.
Ecumenical: Literally "universal," from the Greek oikoumene, the inhabited world.
8] The expanding oikoumene of the Greek world, informed by the Stoic notion of cosmopolis, found its practical realization in the Roman Empire and Roman Law.
Though the details of the early Ionian maps are obscure, it is probable that they represented the oikoumene as a circular disc, that Delphi was the mid-point, and that the landmass of the world was divided into three continents - Europe, Asia, and Libya (= Africa).