Ecumene

(redirected from Oikoumene)

Ecumene

 

(Greek oikumene), a term that was used to designate the part of the earth inhabited by man. The ecumene was first described by Hecataeus of Miletus, who included Europe (except northern Europe), Asia Minor, Southwest Asia, India, and North Africa in the concept of ecumene.

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The Mission of the Orthodox Church in Today's World" is undoubtedly an important document, and the broader oikoumene should welcome and appreciate it.
If Ricoeur stressed the role of utopian and anticipatory action at the grassroots level, then Ernst Lange, a German theologian whose influence on the ecumenical movement is sometimes less acknowledged than it deserves, pointed to the horizon of the worldwide oikoumene as the "utopian anticipation" of radical renewal.
The Dead Marshes, inhabited only by corpses, are a buffer between the familiar oikoumene and the ereme of the Noman-Lands and Mordor.
The oikoumene would then truly represent the whole inhabited world.
This sectarian behavior is amplified as Jews (a) go out into the larger world of the Oikoumene, but also (b) as Israel's political (and hence social) autonomy is repeatedly compromised and ultimately destroyed.
And that led me to another understanding of the word "ecumenical," which comes from the Greek word oikou-mene, from a psalm that says "the earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the oikoumene and all that dwell therein.
Having stressed that, in the second part of our work, we will point out that the updating process of the catholicity of the Church is able to confront the 1 effects of globalization through a discernment of the Christian commitment to the oikoumene, namely, the unity of humankind as well as that of creation in its entirety.
The name refers to the medieval Greek concept of the Roman oikoumene (inhabited world), which embraced Rome and western Europe as well as the "New Rome," Constantinople, and the Byzantine Empire with its Balkin Slavic commonwealth.
Likewise, echoing the current historiographic trend that sees Judaism and Christianity as evolving and adapting within the Islamic oikoumene, Dadoyan discerns layers of syncretization, especially in the appearance of dissident movements and heretical groups.
For more information on the assembly or the WCC, see oikoumene.
187-98), who looks at synodoi and the oikoumene, and stresses the identification of Orthodoxy with the creed of Christ being homoousios with the Father.
If the Gospel's trajectory is toward the saints' sovereignty over the oikoumene, then Constantine is not a betrayal of the Gospel but, in some degree, its fulfillment.