Ecumene

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Ecumene

 

(Greek oikumene), a term that was used to designate the part of the earth inhabited by man. The ecumene was first described by Hecataeus of Miletus, who included Europe (except northern Europe), Asia Minor, Southwest Asia, India, and North Africa in the concept of ecumene.

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The oikoumene now has a very precise connotation, Lange asserts.
At the heart of this thesis is a "triangular concept of Missio Dei, Missio Ecclesia, Oikoumene, and Dikaisune (Justice) and Shalom (Peace) as what constitutes the right balance for effective ecumenical interaction within a pluralistic context shaped by perennial violence" (72).
The trinitarian concept stresses the importance of dialogue for the future oikoumene in multi-ethnic, multicultural, multi-religious contexts.
His vision of the oikoumene, of "tackling challenges and issues together, across denominational and political boundaries" in equal and open collaboration, also led to his advocacy for processes and spaces that promoted listening and the opportunity for a variety of voices to be heard--especially those most directly affected.
It is time for Christian mission to be re-connected with the whole of God's creation, the oikoumene. This is mission which we can do together even with secular society and the communities of other faiths.
But I saw these names as representative of the church, which is--as Dietrich Bonhoeffer put it--Christ existing as community beyond the boundaries of particular identities, divisions and enmities as sanctorum community of the whole oikoumene, the whole inhabited earth.
We do this "together" because Life is for all and because the whole oikoumene is interconnected in God's web of life.
But what of Bonhoeffer's continuing challenge to and influence on the ecumenical movement, understood as the worldwide oikoumene and not simply as the WCC.
Bonhoeffer in this paper forges an understanding of ecumenism as churches and Christians in the oikoumene engaging in a common witness to the truth of Christ, in which their interdependence is crucial.
(5) He notes how the Greek oikoumene was originally used to describe the whole cosmos.
The very word oikoumene had its original context in imperialism.
In Vlada Stankovic's chapter on 'Rethinking the Position of Serbia within Byzantine Oikoumene in the Thirteenth Century', the author's consideration of the Crusaders' capture of Constantinople in 1204 saw the region strengthened through an 'all-encompassing hierarchical system of mutually connected relatives [and] prevented a total political upturn in the region' (p.