Millikan oil-drop experiment

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Millikan oil-drop experiment

[′mil·ə·kən ′ȯil‚dräp ik‚sper·əmənt]
(atomic physics)
A method of determining the charge on an electron, in which one measures the terminal velocities of rise and fall of oil droplets in an electric field after the droplets have picked up charge from ionization in the surrounding gas produced by an x-ray beam.
References in periodicals archive ?
The questions in this compilation range from the general (e.g., that religion has typically impeded the progress of science) to the specific (e.g., that the Millikan oil-drop experiment was simple and straightforward) and are organized into four sections: Medieval and Early Modern Science, Nineteenth Century, Twentieth Century, and Generalizations.
One such example is the famous Millikan oil-drop experiment. This experiment requires the combination of several components that can be dangerous and expensive.
Harvard mathematician Scott Hotton produced a model based on Douady and Couder's oil-drop experiment. The model shows how the forces in that experiment--designed to mimic the motion of primordia--indeed produce golden-angle spirals.