Oeneus

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Oeneus

Oeneus (ēˈnēəs), in Greek mythology, king of Calydon and father of Meleager. When Oeneus forgot to dedicate the fruits of his first crop to Artemis, she terrorized his kingdom with a wild boar, which was killed in the Calydonian hunt.
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Oeneus

Calydonian king; first to cultivate grapes. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 142]
See: Wine
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oineus, king of Calydon in Aetolia, failed to honour Artemis, whereupon the angry goddess sent a monstrous boar to ravage his realm.
Oineus appears bearded, stooped and supported by a gnarled stick, grieving at Meleager's side.
We have two Oinomaoses in the Iliad, one Oineus, and one Oinops, all of them heroes themselves or the fathers or grandfathers of heroes; and one Oinops, the father of an excess-hating diviner, in the Odyssey.
"Is there, in the house of Oineus, dear to Ares, an unmarried daughter, resembling you in stature?
(14.107-8) Because he is the youngest man present Diomedes asserts his right to be heard because of the distinction of his ancestry: Portheus of Pleuron and Kalydon had three sons, Agrios, Melas and Oineus; Oineus was the father of Diomedes' father Tydeus.