Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge


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Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

Address:Rt 2 Box 3330
Folkston, GA 31537

Phone:912-496-7836
Web: www.fws.gov/okefenokee
Established: 1936.
Location:Southern Georgia.
Facilities:Visitor center, picnic area, boat launch, canoe trails, hiking trails, observation tower, auto tour route, historic features.
Activities:Boating (10 hp limit), camping, canoeing, fishing, hiking, biking, hunting, educational programs.
Special Features:Okefenokee Swamp remains one of the oldest and best-preserved freshwater areas in America, covering an area 38 miles long and 25 miles wide. The slow-moving waters form the Suwannee River, which flows southwesterly through Florida into the Gulf of Mexico. The swamp also drains into the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Mary’s River, which forms the boundary between Georgia and Florida.
Habitats: 402,000 acres of freshwater swamp with numerous islands, lakes, forests, and prairies.
Access: Open year round.
Wild life: Wading birds (herons, egrets, ibises, wood stork, sandhill cranes, and bitterns), American alligator, red-cockaded woodpeckers, Florida black bear, green anole.

See other parks in Georgia.
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 95 percent of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge is in Georgia, not Florida.
According to a 1998 status review, which led to the decision, Apalachicola National Forest and adjacent lands support an estimated 400 bears; Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Osceola National Forest, and adjacent lands together contain an estimated 1,200 bears; Ocala National Forest and adjacent lands are estimated to have over 200 bears; and Big Cypress National Preserve and adjacent lands have about 400 beam.
That's the case in Georgia's Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, where restoring the native longleaf pine and wiregrass community should provide a springboard for the unusual gopher tortoise.
The area in question is the 170,000-acre Pinhook Swamp, which connects the Osceola National Forest in Florida and the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia.
The DuPont company had planned a massive project to mine titanium dioxide, a mineral used as white pigment in a number of products, on some 38,000 acres adjacent to the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Scheduled to operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for the next 40 years, the mine threatened to permanently change the flow of groundwater and disrupt the habitat of the swamp's 1,100 species of plants and animals, including such endangered species as wood storks, bald eagles and red-cockaded woodpeckers.