Olaf I


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Olaf I

(Olaf Tryggvason) (ō`läf trüg`väsōn), c.963–1000, king of Norway (995–1000), great-grandson of Harold I. His early life of exile and slavery is surrounded with romantic legend, and little is definitely known of it. He aided his father-in-law, the duke of Poland, in war and took part in harrying the English coast. He may have been present at the famous battle of MaldonMaldon
, town (1991 pop. 14,754) and district, Essex, E England, on the Blackwater estuary. Maldon is a market town with iron foundries and other small industries. The Maldon area has long been known for its sea salt; salt has been harvested there for more than 2000 years.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Later converted to Christianity, he made peace (c.994) with the English. In 995, Olaf went to Norway, overthrew Haakon, and became king. He undertook the conversion of Norway to Christianity by force and by persuasion. He commissioned Lief Ericsson to carry Christianity to Greenland. Olaf died during his defeat at the naval battle of Svolder. The victors, King Sweyn of Denmark and King Olaf of Sweden, divided Norway.

Olaf I

, Olav I
known as Olaf Tryggvesson. ?965--?1000 ad, king of Norway (995--?1000). He began the conversion of Norway to Christianity
References in periodicals archive ?
Hailing the improving reputation of a an institution that has struggled with scandal in the past, an OLAF note claimed: "Within as well as outside the EU institutions OLAF is trusted for dealing efficiently with new information on potential irregularities, fraud or corruption" Last year, the number of allegations requiring assessment increased to a new high of 826, compared with 529 in 2002.
Unlike its predecessor UCLAF (the unsnappily titled 'task force for the co-ordination of fraud prevention'), which was unambiguously an arm of the European Commission, OLAF is supposed to enjoy operational independence from its parent body.
FHB: OLAF is only seven years old and therefore a very young service compared to many of its national partners where you have investigative bodies like HM Revenue & Customs which can look back on a long history.
FHB: OLAF is a department of the European Commission, but independent in its investigations.
A) Our anti-fraud watchdog OLAF is performing a very important job, to fight fraud involving EU money and illegal and irregular behaviour within the EU institutions.
EUROPEAN Union (EU) anti-fraud unit OLAF is always at the centre of Brussels' efforts to suppress the torrents of financial crime that mar its well-intentioned efforts.
THE INDEPENDENCE of European Union (EU) anti-fraud unit OLAF is to be clipped by reforms proposed by the European Commission, which is keen to avoid future scandals such as that involving statistical agency Eurostat.
Cases relating to internal policies and external aid (30%), together with internal investigations (25%) where OLAF is the only authority in charge of the preliminary administrative investigation, represent more than half of the total opening decisions.
OLAF is officially independent from the Commission and other institutions, unlike its predecessor UCLAF, which was part of the Commission.
MEPs, furthermore, propose that the director-general of OLAF is chosen by the EP and Council from a list of six candidates identified by the Commission.
Closer to home, OLAF is investigating how a regional authority in Europe colluded with a builder of a groundwater recharge facility to overlook its breaking of EU environmental regulations, so that the earmarked Euro 700,000 in EU subsidies were not blocked.
BELEAGURED European Union (EU) anti-fraud unit OLAF is to come under further pressure this year, being audited by the EU's financial watchdog the Court of Auditors.