Old High German


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Old High German

a group of West Germanic dialects that eventually developed into modern German; High German up to about 1200: spoken in the Middle Ages on the upper Rhine, in Bavaria, Alsace, and elsewhere, including Alemannic, Bavarian, Langobardic, and Upper Franconian
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, translations of religious texts, and in the ease of Old English and Old High German the source texts were written in Latin, could not have been created freely and without any constraints.
The greatest controversies concern the Tatian Gospel translation; a text which is used by Davis and Bernhardt in their book Syntax of West Germanic: The syntax of Old English and Old High German.
Yet, they constitute a huge body of texts, in the case of both Old English and Old High German, and the price for excluding them from the sample would be very high.
Available sources for the study of Old English and Old High German are limited;
The first important difference is the fact that Old High German is more V-2 than Old English, which may be observed in poetry and authentic prose:
The discrepancy between Old English and Old High German in this respect ranges between 20 and 40%.
This order was quite rare and unnatural for both Old English and Old High German, and it was usually marked and used to enhance the dramatic force of a given utterance (especially in poetry):
The influence of Latin on the V-initial pattern in Old High German
Thus, it must be assumed that translations made in Old English and Old High German are indeed different, and the discrepancies are at least partially due to language claques in Old High German.
In Old High German, however, subjects remain unexpressed quite frequently (almost 20% of all clauses) both in poetry and in translated texts, where subjects are omitted in almost 30% of all cases.
The languages are quite uniform but the most striking result is that virtually all comparisons between languages have yielded statistically significant results, which confirms that Old English and Old High German behave in a very different way in this respect.
As for the existing differences and the noticeable dominance of the V-S pattern in Old High German, the question is whether this order is formed as a result of the V-2 rule, with an element at the beginning of the clause causing an inversion of the subject and the finite verb, or if it exists in isolation, with the finite verb at the beginning of the clause.