Old High German


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Old High German

a group of West Germanic dialects that eventually developed into modern German; High German up to about 1200: spoken in the Middle Ages on the upper Rhine, in Bavaria, Alsace, and elsewhere, including Alemannic, Bavarian, Langobardic, and Upper Franconian
References in periodicals archive ?
Davis and Bernhard (2002), in their pioneering work on West Germanic syntax, claim that Old English and Old High German should be considered dialects of the same language and that their syntax is virtually identical.
For Old High German hagustalt as a gloss for caelebs, see Die althochdeutschen Glossen, ed.
According to his grouping, which includes Gothic evidence as well, the Germanic reduplicated verbs can be subdivided into six major types (reduced later to four): (a) the Gothic reduplicating type, (b) the Old Norse verbapura type in -r-, (c) the Old High German verba impura type in -r-, (d) the Anglian syncopated r-less type, (e) the Anglian syncopated r-type, (f) the Northwest Germanic e-type (Bech 1969: 3) (cf.
The (apparently editorial) decision regarding capitalization of English nouns is uncommon (as in "secondary Umlaut in old high German," p.
417) says, that the user already requires a fair command of Old High German in order to be able to consult this dictionary.
The particular Germanic languages covered are Gothic (Brian Murdoch), Old Norse and Icelandic (Theodore Andersson), Old English (Fred Robinson), Old High German and Continental Old Low German (Brian Murdoch), and Old Saxon as represented by the Heliand (Ronald Murphy).
The German and English words Monat and "month" are both derived from Old High German mano ("moon"), whose original meaning was probably something like "wanderer in the sky.
If we suppose these classes of consonants to have a natural tendency to change their aspirates into medials, medials into tenues, and tenues into aspirates, in passing from an older to a newer dialect, the old High German will be one step farther advanced than the Gothic in the order of these changes, and the Gothic one step farther than the Latin, Greek, and Sanscrit; the latter languages thus bearing exactly the same relation to the Gothic that the Gothic bears to the old High German.
Some address the subject of the transformation of languages such as from old to modern French or Old High German to modern.
First, we must decide whether we want to teach the whole history of the language, from Old High German to the present day (as is done, for example, at Oxford, Cambridge, or Manchester), or only individual, recognized periods such as Middle High German (MHG) or Early New High German (ENHG), as at Newcastle or Bristol.
The smaller crows (krawa in Old High German, Krahe in modern German) have a less sinister reputation, although they may feed on carrion, too.