Saxon

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Saxon

1. a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
2. a native or inhabitant of Saxony
3. 
a. the Low German dialect of Saxony
b. any of the West Germanic dialects spoken by the ancient Saxons or their descendants
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient Saxons, the Anglo-Saxons, or their descendants
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
www.anglo-saxons.net
www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/anglo_saxons/index.shtml
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Martin Friedrich's "Jesus Christ between Jews and Heathens: The Germanic Mission and the Portrayal of Christ in the Old Saxon Heliand," in addition to incidentally reviewing much Heliand scholarship, looks at the Germanicization of Christianity in the context of Judaism and how the Jesus story might have been perceived by the Saxons in their time of conversion.
(8) The first element, English mirk, later murk(y), means "dark(ness)" in all the Germanic languages, as in Old Norse myrkr, Old English mirce, myrce, Old Saxon mirki; and in Modern Norwegian and Swedish mork, Danish mark.
In this paper, I examine one strand of these exchanges and propose a missionary context for the Old English Genesis B, the Old Saxon Heliand, and the fragmentary Vatican Genesis.
There is, of course, no certainty that all poets follow the same principles for such a rare phenomenon, and the greater use made of such lines in some poems - Bliss omits Genesis B altogether because its debt to Old Saxon makes it a special case (cf.
376, for all that it is a hapax legomenon in Old English and doubtless derives from the Old Saxon original's 'landskepi'.
Although alliteration is a common device in almost all poetry, the only Indo-European languages that used it as a governing principle, along with strict rules of accent and quantity, were Old Norse, Old English, Old Saxon, and Old High German.
The Old Saxon Heliand is one of the most unusual accounts of the Christian gospel story a modern reader may encounter, justly famous for the strange admixture of Germanic spirit to the story of Christ, the Savior.
A CORNFIELD BY THE FOOTPATH THE READING ROOMS AN OLD SAXON CROSS IN THE CHURCHYARD THE WOODEN PATHWAY THROUGH THE FIELDS PART OF THE WOODEN WALKWAY
And "bede" is the old Saxon word for prayer, so it is not known whether that was even his real name.
The Rose & Crown is a charming 18th Century coaching inn set on the middle green next to the old Saxon church known as the Cathedral of the Dale.
This is an old Saxon area, there are Saxon dwellings and lanes, there's a lot here of historical interest.