Saxon

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Saxon

1. a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
2. a native or inhabitant of Saxony
3. 
a. the Low German dialect of Saxony
b. any of the West Germanic dialects spoken by the ancient Saxons or their descendants
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient Saxons, the Anglo-Saxons, or their descendants
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
www.anglo-saxons.net
www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/anglo_saxons/index.shtml
References in periodicals archive ?
Martin Friedrich's "Jesus Christ between Jews and Heathens: The Germanic Mission and the Portrayal of Christ in the Old Saxon Heliand," in addition to incidentally reviewing much Heliand scholarship, looks at the Germanicization of Christianity in the context of Judaism and how the Jesus story might have been perceived by the Saxons in their time of conversion.
Green adds to this, pointing out that doom can also mean renown or praise in the older Germanic languages: Gothic doms 'renown,' Old English dom 'honor, praise,' Old Norse domr 'opinion,' and Old Saxon dom 'honor, praise' (44-45).
But such readings ignore what might well have been the state of affairs at this point in the Old Saxon antecedent of the Old English poem.
That may be too much to hope for in the case of Old Saxon and, even more, Old High German, the alliterative metre of which is less tight than that of Old English, so that a wider range of syllabic structures might have seemed acceptable.
Heliand ("Savior") Epic on the life of Christ written in Old Saxon alliterative verse dating to approximately AD 830.
His examination of how these initially pagan notions were subsumed into the Christian idea of divine providence, and most notably blended together in the Old English Beowulf and Old Saxon Heliand, provide us with a basis for understanding how even the Valar are subject to time and the fate decreed by Iluvatar.
According to a contemporary biographer, tearing down the old Saxon cathedral brought Wulfstan to tears - "pompusly destroying the work of saints", he called it - but down it came nonetheless.
Welsh' is based on the old Saxon word 'Wealas' which means stranger, foreigner, invader - they were called that when they invaded Germany.
Mr Littlewood added: "People are always interested to hear how Wyken Knob got its name - it's actually the old Saxon word for pit and hill, so it would have been a place where sand or gravel pits were being dug.
In the poetry, adjectival Old Saxon mest, Old English moest when strongly declined is without an article; with an article it is weakly declined, and article and adjective stand next to each other.
Continental place-names have two corresponding elements, werth mainly Frisian and Low German and wurth Old Saxon and Old High German, corresponding phonetically to weord and wyrd respectively.
It is also the first edition of one of the few surviving scraps of Old Saxon for more than a century.