Saxon

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Saxon

1. a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
2. a native or inhabitant of Saxony
3. 
a. the Low German dialect of Saxony
b. any of the West Germanic dialects spoken by the ancient Saxons or their descendants
4. of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient Saxons, the Anglo-Saxons, or their descendants
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
www.anglo-saxons.net
www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/anglo_saxons/index.shtml
References in periodicals archive ?
Tjitze Baarda's "The Parable of the Fisherman in the Heliand: The Old Saxon Version of Matthew 13:47-50" argues, in highly technical fashion (Baarda is a scholar of New Testament studies, writing as an outsider here), against the claim of Dutch scholar Gilles Quispel that the Heliand, by referring in this passage from Matthew to a man who casts a net rather than to a fishing-net itself, shows dependence on a lost text about Jesus independent of the canonical Gospels.
Similarly, although he later expresses doubts about a `Germanisierung des Christentums' this does hot stop the author from seeing Old Saxon thiodan as denoting Christ as leader of a Germanic war-band or herro likewise, rather than as a term of emergent feudalism.
It also offers some lines of the first song in the original Old Saxon alliterative verse.
Green adds to this, pointing out that doom can also mean renown or praise in the older Germanic languages: Gothic doms 'renown,' Old English dom 'honor, praise,' Old Norse domr 'opinion,' and Old Saxon dom 'honor, praise' (44-45).
Many of the words and names he employs in the history of Middle-earth arise from Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German, and even the fragmentary Gothic, old and lost words whose sounds and forms allowed Tolkien to adapt and recreate them to capture the resonance of other times and create new signification.
According to a contemporary biographer, tearing down the old Saxon cathedral brought Wulfstan to tears - "pompusly destroying the work of saints", he called it - but down it came nonetheless.
This small village is situated in the old kingdom of Mercia very near to the old Saxon holdings of Repton, Lichfield and Tamworth.
Even this short article has probably used words or phrases from half a dozen different languages ( French, old Saxon, Gaelic and probably from across the world.
It is related to Old Saxon raedislo, Frisian riedsel, and Old High German radisle, and it has its counterparts in contemporary German Rdtsel (cf.
Geoffrey Russom here applies his word-foot theory of Old English metre to the metres of Old Norse fornyrdislag, the Old Saxon Heliand, and the Old High German Hildebrandslied and explains their varying divergence from Old English metre as a consequence of the linguistic differences between these various Germanic languages, Old Norse losing unstressed vowels retained in Old English and, conversely, Old Saxon restoring unstressed vowels lost in Old English.