old media

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old media

The forms of communicating prior to the digital world, which include analog radio and TV and printed materials such as books and magazines. Contrast with new media.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Bradley Johnson, the director of data analytics for Ad Age's DataCenter, the Bureau of Labor Statistics lumps many new-media workers in with old-media industries.
Indeed, for many old-media companies, digital jobs that didn't exist a few years ago are fueling the largest areas of employment growth.
As Johnson points out, if an old-media company wants to survive in the future, it has one choice: become a new-media company.
The emerging broadband networks, which promise to bring broadcast and online technologies together in a platform that fosters interactivity and exchange, has the potential finally to realize that vision--but only if public-interest policies are in place insuring that the old-media giants won't be able to stifle competition and diversity in the new-media environment, too.
The dot-com downturn can lead old-media news managers to perceive the Internet as a failed experiment -- that there's little money to be made online ("or they would have figured it out by now") -- and downplay its importance.
New journalism graduates often trained in how to work in new- as well as old-media environments; they're more likely to adapt to newsroom work routines requiring a variety of skills.
coms, the companies that truly understand the potential and are not hindered by old-media business models that are difficult to throw away.
But, I believe that in the coming years online journalism jobs will be as plentiful as old-media journalism jobs.
Hard on the heels of Disney, NBC and USA Networks, another big old-media company decided this week that it needed a bigger bite of the new-media world.
To old-media minds used to thinking in television terms, portals look a lot like big TV networks, aggregating lots and lots of eyeballs that can interest big advertisers.
Burn Rate'' is published by one of those stuffy old-media companies, Simon & Schuster, and costs $25.