Oldenburg


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Oldenburg

(ôl`dənbo͝orkh), former state, NW Germany. It is now included in the state of Lower SaxonyLower Saxony,
Ger. Niedersachsen , state (1994 pop. 7,480,000), 18,295 sq mi (47,384 sq km), NW Germany. Hanover is the capital. The state was formed in 1946 by the merger of the former Prussian province of Hanover with the former states of Brunswick, Oldenburg, and
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. The city of Oldenburg was the capital. The former state consisted of three widely separated divisions. The largest of these, Oldenburg proper, now forms the district of Oldenburg, stretching S from the North Sea, W of the Weser River; the two other divisions, both very small, were Birkenfeld and the district (but not the city) of LübeckLübeck
, city (1994 pop. 217,270), Schleswig-Holstein, central Germany, on the Trave River near its mouth on the Baltic Sea. It is a major port and a commercial and industrial center; the port is the city's primary employer.
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. Oldenburg proper is a low-lying, fertile, and marshy land. The history of Oldenburg proper is mainly of dynastic significance. Originally a part of Saxony, the county of Oldenburg came into prominence in the 12th cent., when the counts became princes of the empire. In 1448, Count Christian became king of Denmark as Christian I, while his younger brother, Gerard, and his successors continued to rule Oldenburg. On the extinction (1667) of the German line, Oldenburg passed (1676) to Christian V of Denmark (direct descendant of Christian I). In 1773, Christian VII exchanged Oldenburg for ducal HolsteinHolstein,
former duchy, N central Germany, the part of Schleswig-Holstein S of the Eider River. Kiel and Rendsburg were the chief cities. For a description of Holstein and for its history after 1814, see Schleswig-Holstein.
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 with Grand Duke (later Emperor) Paul I of Russia. Paul gave Oldenburg to his maternal great uncle, Frederick Augustus of Holstein-Gottorp, bishop of Lübeck, who assumed (1777) the ducal title. Peter I of Oldenburg, nephew and successor of Frederick Augustus, lost the duchy to Napoleon I but recovered Oldenburg and the bishopric of Lübeck in 1813 and subsequently acquired Birkenfeld and obtained the title grand duke. A member of the German Confederation from 1815, Oldenburg sided (1866) with Prussia in the Austro-Prussian War and joined (1871) the German Empire. The last grand duke abdicated in 1918, and Oldenburg joined the Weimar Republic.

Oldenburg,

city (1994 pop. 147,701), Lower Saxony, NW Germany, on the Hunte River and the Küstenkanal (Coast Canal). It is a rail junction, transshipment point, agricultural market, and industrial center. Manufactures include ships, glass, and textiles. Oldenburg was first mentioned in 1108 and was chartered in 1345. It was the seat of the counts of Oldenburg until 1667, when it passed, with the county, to Denmark. From 1777 to 1918 it served as the residence of the dukes (later grand dukes) of Oldenburg. Noteworthy buildings include the former ducal palace (17th–18th cent.) and the Gothic Lambertikirche, a church built in the 13th cent. (rebuilt 18th–19th cent.).
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Oldenburg

 

the name of a number of dynasties descended from the Oldenburgs, a family of German counts. From 1448 to 1863 representatives of the House of Oldenburg ruled in Denmark, where Christian I was the first king of the dynasty. They also ruled in the two other countries of the Kalmar Union, Norway and Sweden. In Norway they were in power from 1450 to 1814, and in Sweden from 1457 to 1523, except for one interval. They also ruled Schleswig-Holstein from 1460 to 1863. One of the collateral lines of the Oldenburgs was the family Gottorp. The Glücksburg dynasty traces its lineage, through collateral lines, back to the Oldenburgs.


Oldenburg

 

beginning in the 12th century, a county in northern Germany with the city of Oldenburg as the main city. From 1667 to 1773 the county of Oldenburg was a possession of the Danish kings. It became a duchy in 1777 and was a grand duchy from 1815 to 1918. A state in Germany from 1918 to 1945, Oldenburg became a district in the Land (state) of Lower Saxony in 1946. Oldenburg was at first in the English zone of occupied Germany, but in 1949 it became part of the Federal Republic of Germany.


Oldenburg

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the Land (state) of Lower Saxony, on the Hunte River, a tributary of the Weser River, at the Hunte-Ems Canal. Population, 132,100 (1971). A transportation junction, Oldenburg is an industrial center with electrical, agricultural, and other branches of machine building. Other industries include food processing, the manufacture of textiles, glassmaking, and woodworking. Oldenburg has a botanical garden. [18–1144–2; updated]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Oldenburg

1
Claes . born 1929, US pop sculptor and artist, born in Sweden

Oldenburg

2
1. a city in NW Germany, in Lower Saxony: former capital of Oldenburg state. Pop.: 158 340 (2003 est.)
2. a former state of NW Germany: became part of Lower Saxony in 1946
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Though not trained in architecture, Oldenburg grew up in a home that valued art and design; his father, a draftsman by trade, taught in high schools.
"Oldenburg is very well positioned thanks to the technical competence and experience of its employees and its infrastructure," said Mark PaBkowski, Oldenburg site manager.
This exhibition, organized by Achim Hochdorfer, Curator of the mumok Ann Temkin, Chief Curator of painting and sculpture at MoMA and Paulina Pobocha, Assistant Curator, constitutes the largest-ever presentation of Oldenburg's earliest witty and gritty expressionistic sculptures, arranged within an immersive, oversized environment.
With the addition of the Paint Torch, Philadelphia boasts four public, large-scale Oldenburg and Oldenburg-van Bruggen sculptures; the largest number worldwide.
Even as The Street, 1960, and The Store, 1961, took the form of installations, Oldenburg drew back from Kaprow's totalizing environmental impulse.
Known for several years as the German Sundance, the screenings are a mix of independent films with a few larger films thrown in, says Oldenburg fest director Torsten Neumann.
The work employees perform in the 400,000-square-foot structure off International Way makes it a "tier one facility, which means we want it available for the company's operations 24/7," Oldenburg said.
Oldenburg will be charged with at least several counts of receiving stolen property and that he will be summoned into Central District Court on those charges.
Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen: The Music Room
Dowry deaths: "a postcolonial society's worst nightmare come true" is how Veena Talwar Oldenburg identifies her investigation into a practice that leaves Indians "culturally embarrassed "and "pedagogically nonplussed."
The first, "Claes Oldenburg Drawings, 1959-1977," includes 74 drawings that are smaller and more intimate.
Oldenburg Stamler has won a R20 million order for its coal winning machines from Khutala coal mine in Mpumalanga, South Africa - after going head-to-head at the coal face against the equipment of a rival manufacturer.