Tambo

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Tambo

Oliver. 1917--93, South African politician; president (1977--91) of the African National Congress. He was arrested (1956) with Nelson Mandela but released (1957)
References in periodicals archive ?
As the ANC-led Gauteng Provincial Government, we deeply share the values and vision of Oliver Tambo and Nelson Mandela.
When it comes to writing about Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo, since they are historical figures, we must use the normal standards for weighing historical evidence in matters that concern them.
A walking tour through Newtown – cited as Jo'burg's artistic hub – took us past Chancellor House in the heart of the business district, famous as the building from which Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo ran the city's first black legal practice in 1952.
A walking tour through Newtown, cited as Jo'burg's artistic hub, took us past Chancellor House, in the heart of the business district, famous as the building from which Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo ran the city's first black legal practice in 1952.
Once, while attending the funeral of his friend Oliver Tambo, a former ANC president, Mandela ran into Bridgewater at the Carlton Hotel in Johannesburg, where he was greeting guests who'd come for the funeral.
He did it with the support of several other distinguished South African freedom fighters, including Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo, fellow leaders of the African National Congress; Winnie Mandela, his soulmate in struggle until they divorced; and finally Mozambique freedom fighter Graa Machel, his last life partner and widow.
Mr Mandela immersed himself in official talKs to end white minority rule and in 1991 was elected ANC President to replace Oliver Tambo.
Here he met Oliver Tambo, a lifelong friend and comrade in the anti-apartheid movement.
He started making trouble at Fort Hare University, a public university in Alice, Eastern Cape, South Africa, where he met Oliver Tambo, with whom he became a lifelong friend and colleague in the struggle against apartheid.
South Africans have fond memories of these leaders - men and women such as Albertina and Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo, Anton Lembede and Govan Mbeki - particularly in today's political climate, which is characterised by greed and rampant accumulation of wealth, often through corruption.
He along with his friend Oliver Tambo and several others formed the Youth League of the African National Congress with the hope of strengthening the movement against apartheid.